WORLD CLASS COLLECTION
BROWSE THE ENTIRE TRANSPORTATION COLLECTION (Note: Much of our collection is readily viewable on our grounds; some is in storage or maintenance and thus not. Call ahead if you are visiting for a particular artifact to verify it is on display.)
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1901 
St. Louis Motor Carriage
St. Louis Motor Carriage Co.
MAKE
Carriage Auto
MODEL
This carriage auto originally cost $1,200 and is the oldest of nine of this make in existence. It is powered by a one-cylinder, 7-hp engine; employed the first float carburetor; equipped with a tilting steering wheel; and has a chain drive to the rear axle. St. Louis Motor Carriage Company was a manufacturer of automobiles at 1211–13 North Vandeventer Avenue in St. Louis, Missouri, founded by George Preston Dorris (later credited with developing and patenting the float-carburetor) and John French in 1898, with French taking charge of marketing and Dorris heading engineering and production. St. Louis Motor Carriage was the first of many St. Louis automakers and produced automobiles from 1899 to 1907.
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1953/1960 
Bobby Darin “Dream Car”
Andy Di Dia
MAKE
Custom Build
MODEL
The Bobby Darin “Dream Car” is a one-of-a-kind custom car designed by Detroit clothing designer Andy Di Dia in 1953 and completed in 1960. Mr. Di Dia apparently did not care for the design of automobiles in the early 1950’s. The Di Dia 150 was hand-built by four workers in Detroit, Michigan between 1953 and 1960 at a cost of over $93,000 dollars. The original Cadillac V8 engine was replaced by a Ford 427/365 hp V8 engine.  The body and chassis are hand-formed in aluminum with an aluminum alloy welded tube frame.  The car has hidden windshield wipers, retracting headlights, swiveling turn signals, and doors that opened with a push on a panel outside of the car (there are no door handles) and a trunk that was hinged from the driver’s side. The Dream Car was also equipped with the first backseat-mounted radio speakers.  The interior is rust-colored to contrast with the ruby colored exterior.  The car has 30 coats of paint with ground industrial diamond dust to add sparkle. Bobby Darin, a well-known singer, purchased the car from Mr. Di Dia, and as a result, it became forever known as Bobby Darin’s Dream Car.
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1963 
Chrysler Turbine Car
Chrysler Corporation
MAKE
Turbine Car
MODEL
A total of 55 Turbine cars were built by Chrysler Corporation.  The body of the car was handmade by Ghia, an Italian Design Studio, and then shipped to the United States where the engine was installed.  Five cars were built in 1962 as prototypes used for troubleshooting, and each was slightly different from the others.  A total of 50 identical turbine cars were built between October 1963 and October 1964. They were all two-door hardtop coupes with power brakes and power steering.  All were painted identically with a color known as “Turbine Bronze." The engine that powered the turbine car could operate on many different fuels, required less maintenance and lasted longer than the piston engine.
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1959 
Ford CT-1100 Gas Turbine Truck Tractor
Ford
MAKE
Gas Turbine Tractor
MODEL
In 1952, Ford Motor Co. began a test program to explore the use of gas turbine engines for automobiles and trucks. An improved version of the gas turbine engine was tested in a tilt-cab truck tractor with a 300-horsepower, 704-cubic-inch-displacement engine--this 1959 CT-1100 was the first vehicle used to test it. The main advantages of the turbine engine were low noise, emissions, oil consumption, and vibration; easy cold-weather starting; extended overhaul life; high torque at low speeds; and instantaneous full-power capability. High fuel consumption at idle and costly manufacturing materials needed because of their high operating speeds and temperatures prevented successful turbine use in cars or trucks. Ford gave up development in 1973. This truck tractor was donated by Ford in 1971.
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1923 
Stanley Steamer
Steam Car - Similar to an 8-cylinder internal combustion engine
MAKE
Stanley Motor Carriage Co.
MODEL
Stanley steam cars utilized an external combustion engine where the fuel source is consumed external to the engine. A steam boiler generates great quantities of power for later use, unlike an internal combustion engine that must develop the needed power on demand. Kerosene was used to light the pilot and main burner of the external engine as it provided more heat energy than gasoline. Kerosene was also less expensive and safer. It would take at least 20 minutes to start a Stanley Steamer. Fuel consumption was approximately one gallon of water per 10 to 12 miles.
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1912 
Pierce 4 Motorcycle
Motorcycle 4-cylinder
MAKE
Pierce Motorcycle Co. (Parent company was Pierce-Arrow Motor Car Co.)
MODEL
The Pierce 4 was the first 4-cylinder motorcycle produced in the United States. It has a T-head, inline-4 with compression release 708cc engine with a two-speed transmission and could attain a speed of 60 mph. The frame of the Pierce has very large diameter partitioned integrated tubing for gasoline and oil.
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1957 
1957 Chevy Bel Air
Chevrolet
MAKE
Bel Air
MODEL
The 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air model is the upscale model and is a popular, sought after classic car. The '57 Chevy, as it is often known, is an auto icon.
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1964 
1964 1/2 Ford Mustang
Ford
MAKE
Mustang
MODEL
In 1961, Ford General Manager Lee Iacocca aimed to sell a sports car with four seats, low weight, and a price tag under $2,500. In 1964, Iacocca's vision became a success with the introduction of the Ford Mustang. After selling more than 22,000 Mustangs on the first official sale date, Ford proved that it could manufacture an affordable sports car that the average American family could enjoy. It sports a 200 cubic inch, inline 6 cylinder engine; 108 inch wheelbase. Built in Dearborn, MI; price new $2,372. The new car was introduced to the public on April 17, 1964 at the New York World's Fair. This 1964 1/2 Mustang holds a coveted spot in American muscle car history, as it was the first generation of Ford Mustangs to be produced. Mustangs remain a "classic" American car to this day.
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1951 
Chrysler New Yorker Station Wagon
Chrysler
MAKE
New Yorker Wagon
MODEL
The Chrysler New Yorker 4 door station wagon was introduced in January 1951.  Chrysler produced only a total of 251 units of this model. The New Yorker was powered by a 331 cubic inch (5.4 liter) 180 hp Hemi V-8 engine called the “Firepower” engine.  It was also equipped with power steering which was an industry first.  The New Yorker also had fold down rear seats to provide more cargo space. Statistically, the New Yorker was 213.25 inches in length, 75.125 inches in width, and had a 131.5-inch wheelbase.  Its top speed was approximately 98 mph, and fuel consumption was 10.9 mpg. The original manufacturer’s suggested retail price for the New Yorker Wagon was $4026.00.
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1937 
1937 Chevrolet
Chevrolet
MAKE
MODEL
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1917 
1917 Chevrolet
Chevrolet
MAKE
MODEL
Wooden frame
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1912 
1912 Traffic Truck
MAKE
Traffic Truck
MODEL
Built in St. Louis.  22 horsepower gave it a top speed of 12 miles per hour.
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1908 
Galloway GT Farm Wagon/Truck
Galloway
MAKE
Truck
MODEL
The William Galloway Company of Waterloo, Iowa, had been a farm implement dealership and mail-order supplier of small farming equipment and tools before it introduced its line of trucks in 1908. The Galloway GT was marketed as a dual-purpose vehicle, "drive to church on Sunday and be put back to work on Monday." This unrestored truck features a two-cylinder, chain-driven, water-cooled engine. Research reveals it to be the oldest surviving delivery truck used in the city of St. Louis and one of fewer than ten Galloways to survive. Engine Type: 2 cylinder Horsepower: 14 Displacement: 142 Cubic inches Price New: $570.00 Donated to the Museum in 1972 by William Abbott.
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1915 
Model T Ford Touring Car
Ford
MAKE
Model T Touring Car
MODEL
The Model T had a front mounted 177 cubic inch inline four-cylinder engine producing 20 hp for a top speed of 40-45 mph. The cost of a 1915 Model T was approximately $390 dollars. Henry Ford’s approach to the Model T design was one of getting it right and never changing.  He believed the Model T was all the car a person would ever need.  However, there were design changes. For example, in 1915 the hood design retained the five-sided design but louvers were added to the vertical sides, and electric headlights replaced carbide headlights. In 1917 Ford ceased production of the Model T and began production of the Model A. Model T engines were produced until 1941.
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1890 
Hearse
MAKE
MODEL
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1919 
Dorris 6-80 Panel Truck
Dorris
MAKE
Truck
MODEL
AUTO
1904-05  
A. L. Dyke Steam Car
A. L. Dyke Auto Supply Company
MAKE
Steam Car
MODEL
Steam Kit Car by A. L. Dyke Auto Supply Company. Established in St.Louis MO in 1899 by A.L.Dyke (Andrew Lee Dyke), Dyke was the first American auto parts business. Dyke also sold early autos, kit car or assembled. In addition to the Dyke name, the company also sold automobiles under the St. Louis (St. Louis Motor Company) and Dyke-Britton names.
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Indian Motorcycle
Indian
MAKE
Motorcycle
MODEL
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1969 
Fire Bug
Firetruck
MAKE
George Barris, Barris Custom Cars
MODEL
Fire Bug was a a car-sized fire truck. First used by the Los Angeles Fire Department, it was later driven by the zany Banana Splits characters in a TV show, "The Banana Splits Adventure Hour."
The original plan was for this creation, the Fire Bug, to be a promotional or parade rig for the Los Angeles City Fire Department during Fire Prevention Week and such, even though it lacks the departmental markings you might expect. It was a 1969 collaboration between George Barris and his partner-of-the-moment, Dick Dean. Mechanically, it's a chopped-pan Volkswagen Microbus, oddly fitted with dual rear wheels.
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1912 
Overland 61-T
Overland
MAKE
61-T
MODEL
Overland 61-T automobile owned by the Museum which had been used in the film, "The Great Race," starring Jack Lemmon, Tony Curtis, and Natalie Wood, inspired by the actual 1908 New York to Paris race.
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1911 
Hudson Model 33 Touring Car
Hudson
MAKE
Model 33 Touring Car
MODEL
Hudson Model 33 Touring car once owned by W.C. Fields.
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1913 
Cartercar Model 5 Roadster
Cartercar
MAKE
Model 5 Roadster
MODEL
Cartercar Model 5 Roadster used in the 1965 film, "The Great Race," inspired by the actual 1908 New York to Paris race.
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1931 
Adolphus Bus
Yellow Truck and Coach Division of General Motors
MAKE
Bus
MODEL
The Yellow Truck and Coach of GM built this parlor coach as the ultimate in highway travel. The exterior appearance is that of a conventional Z-250 model passenger bus; however, this proto RV offers all the comforts of home with air conditioning, Pullman berths, a kitchen telephone, and lavatory including a shower. It was typically operated by a crew of three. The bus designed initially used by the president of Buick Motor Division. It was later purchased by Anheuser-Busch of Saint Louis, Missouri, where it provided August A. Busch Jr. first class transportation o numerous trips across the country (1941-1946). Inline 6-cylinder, 616 cid, 150 hp., wheelbase: 250," built in Pontiac MI, acquired by Museum in 1969.
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BiState Development Agency Bus #7063
MAKE
Bus
MODEL
Donated to Museum in 1996 by Bi-State Development Agency.
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AUTO
 
St. Louis Public Service #4878
Yellow Coach Division of General Motors
MAKE
Model TDH 4006 City Transit Bus
MODEL
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AUTO
1938 
Lincoln Willoughby Model K Touring Car
Lincoln
MAKE
Willoughby Model K Touring Car
MODEL
Lincoln Willoughby Model K Touring Car used to chauffeur dignitaries at the New York 1939 World's Fair.
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AUTO
1962 
Ghia L6.4
Ghia
MAKE
L6.4
MODEL
Ghia L6.4 once owned by Dean Martin.
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1998 
1998 Reynard Champ CART-series Race Car
Hogan Racing
MAKE
Reynard Champ CART-series Race Car
MODEL
St. Louis based Hogan Racing raced this CART-series car in 1998 which features a fiber, Kevlar reinforced body. In its racing condition, a Mercedes-Benz engine powered the 1,525 pound car at speeds of over 200 miles per hour. Hogan Racing fielded several future superstar drivers, including future Indy 500 winner Helio Castroneves, who raced this car and for whom this car is lettered. The Reynard showcases Hogan's St. Louis heritage by featuring the logos of the St. Louis Cardinals, Blues, and former Rams. It was used as a show and exhibit car following its retirement from racing. Engine Type: V8; displacement: 161.5 CI; 850 hp; wheelbase: 119.5 inches
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Crosley Auto
Crosley Motors Inc.
MAKE
MODEL
Engine Type: 4 cylinder, Crosley COBRA Horsepower: 26.5 Wheelbase: 80"
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1954 
Willys Fire Truck 1955 – Emerson Fire Department
Willys and Valley Equipment
MAKE
Firetruck
MODEL
Built 1954, by Willys in Toledo, Ohio Body made by Valley Equipment, Bay City, Michigan Four wheel drive
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1963 
Divco Retail-Delivery Milk Truck
Detroit Industrial Vehicles Company
MAKE
Delivery Truck
MODEL
Divco was a brand name of delivery trucks built and marketed in the United States. Divco is an acronym which stands for Detroit Industrial Vehicles Company. Built in 1963, this model may be driven standing or sitting. When standing, the throttle and brake were mounted on the steering column. This model has a Ford engine. It was used by Bailey Dairy until the early 1980s. Divco was known for its multi-stop delivery trucks, particularly in use as home delivery vehicles by dairy producers.
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1925 
Autocar Lumber Truck
Autocar Company
MAKE
Lumber Truck Model 27K
MODEL
This Autocar truck was donated to the Museum in 1961, three years after it went out of service. At that time the president of Maplewood Planing Mill Co., Alan C. Blood, said that when his father purchased the truck for the company in 1925. He partially paid for it "by trading in a team of horses, a wagon, and a half carload of hay." In its thirty-three years of service this truck hauled countless thousands of board feet of lumber from the Missouri Pacific's Greenwood Boulevard tracks to the Maplewood Mill at 2731 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood MO, about a half-mile away. It has a three-ton capacity. Model:  27K Engine Type: 4 cylinder Horsepower: 25 Displacement: 276 cubic inches Price New: $3,550.00 Built in: Ardmore PA The Autocar Company is an American specialist manufacturer of severe-duty, Class 7 and Class 8 vocational trucks started in 1897 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as a manufacturer of Brass Era automobiles, and trucks from 1899, Autocar is the oldest surviving motor vehicle brand in the Western Hemisphere. Donated to Museum in 1961 by Maplewood Planing Mill Company.
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Circa 1912-1913 
Chase Model D Express Mail Truck
Chase
MAKE
Mail Truck
MODEL
This is believed to be the first truck used to haul mail in the State of Alabama. The Chase Motor Truck Company was founded in 1907, and its three-cylinder engine was used beginning in 1910. The truck has a three-cylinder, two-stroke, air-co0led, 20 horsepower engine, is chain-driven, and has a load capacity of 1,500 pounds. Price new $900; built in Syracuse NY. Museum acquired the truck in 1972 from donor Robert W. Abbott.
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1920 
Chicago Derrick Truck
Chicago Truck Company
MAKE
MODEL
This Chicago truck was an "assembled" vehicle that was created using components from various suppliers; it was a common practice, with dozens of brands manufacturing trucks in the United States. The Chicago truck company was founded in 1906 for the sale and maintenance of trucks and built its first vehicle in 1919. The firm was out of business by 1932. Featuring a four-cylinder Hercules engine with a chain drive, and solid tires, this truck was used for many years by the donor for transporting fuel tanks. Engine Type: 4 cylinder Hercules Horsepower: 27 Displacement: 251 Cubic inches Price New: $2,290.00 Built in: Chicago IL Donated to Museum Of Transportation in 1964 by Standard Oil Company of Indiana.
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1919 
Ford Model TT Truck
Ford
MAKE
Model TT Truck
MODEL
The Model TT was a one-ton truck that derived from a Model T car chassis; it utilized a stronger frame, heavier rear axle, and the addition of two rear springs.  The truck debuted in 1917 selling for $600.00.  Ford only sold the engine and the chassis leaving it up to the buyer to either custom complete the truck cab and body themselves or pay a coach builder to finish it for them. By the 1920's Ford added the option of a cab, which cost another $45-$65. The versatility of the TT made it useful to farmers and merchants; as fire trucks, dump trucks, and passenger vehicles.  By 1928, 1.3 million Ford Model TTs had been sold. This truck arrived at the museum in 1997 in several crates. A team of dedicated volunteers re-assembled and restored it. Engine Type: 4 cylinder Horspower: 20 Displacement: 176.7 cubic inches Price New: $550.00 Built in: Detroit MI Donated to the Museum in 1997 by William Englebrecht.
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1954 
International Pickup Truck
International Harvester
MAKE
Pickup Truck
MODEL
Although farm equipment was at the heart of the International Harvester's business, it also included a highly competitive truck line established in 1907. With growing competition in the farm machinery industry, the company launched a national ad campaign in 1954 called, "The International Truck Caravan." The caravan showcased the truck line and toured the country stopping at at local dealerships. International Harvester built light-duty trucks until 1975. The company's truck division was sold to Navistar International Corporation in 1986. Engine Type: 6 cylinder Horsepower: 100 Displacement: 220.5 Cubic inches Price New: $1,484.00 Built in: Canto IL Donated to the Museum in 1988 by William and Irene Blackwell.
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1929 
A 1929 Elgin-Leach Corp. Street Sweeper
Elgin-Leach
MAKE
Street Sweeper
MODEL
This Elgin Model D street sweeper was the company's first machine designed specifically for automobile traffic.  The brushes concentrated on the curbs instead of the center of the street waste removal typical for horse-drawn traffic.  This 1929 street sweeper is believed to be the oldest street sweeper in America
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1925 
1925 Dodge Brothers 2-Door Coach – 5P Police Car Replication
Dodge Brothers
MAKE
2-Door Coach - 5P
MODEL
Although the St. Louis County Police Department was not established until July 1, 1955, this 1925  Dodge Brothers 2-door coach was restored and painted to replicate a police car of the 1920s. This car served as a public relations attraction and was displayed at many community events before it was donated to the Museum in 2004. Engine type: L-head 4 cylinder; displacement: 212.3 cubic inches; horsepower :24.03; wheelbase: 116 inches; donor: Charles and June Gallagher.      
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1950 
Dodge Coronet Consolidated Service Car
Dodge
MAKE
Coronet
MODEL
Service cars operated in the same manner as buses and streetcars as they had regular routes with regular stops. Cab drivers and bus companies loathed these cars as they were cheaper to ride  and stole potential customers. By the 1960s, most service car companies had shut and survivors operated limited routes in north St. Louis. The Consolidated Service Car Co. was the last to offer rides and was eventually bought by Bi-State in 1962. However, most drivers owned their cars and continued their service. With the support of the Committee of Racial Equality (CORE), they charged no fare but accepted 'donations' as 'freedom riders.' Bi-State added more routes to compete with the unlicensed service cars but the African American residents boycotted the buses in these areas. The dispute was settled in 1966. This is the last running and remaining service car. Engine type: 6-cyl. L-Head; Displacement: 230 cubic inches; Horsepower: 103; Built in: San Leandro CA; Donors: Herman Perkins, Anthony Sansone, Consolidated Service Car Co.; Acquired by Museum in 1967.
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Late 1800s-early 1900s 
Banner Buggy Co. Doctor’s Buggy
Banner Buggy Co.
MAKE
Doctor's Buggy
MODEL
Physicians used buggies of this type to make house calls to their patients often bartering for their services. The Banner Buggy Co. was one of the largest horse-drawn vehicle manufacturers in the country.
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1910 
Buick Motor Bus
Buick
MAKE
Bus
MODEL
Buick built trucks for a very short time. One body style available was the “Old English Motor Bus." It is believed that this is one of the only surviving models of this type. Typically, they were used by hotels as a courtesy vehicle or for sightseeing. The twelve passenger bus has a 2 cylinder 22 horse power engine located under the front seat and it is chain-driven. Donated in 1973 by William S. Abbott, this rare antique was restored to operating condition in 1995 through the generosity of the Buick Automobile Dealers of St. Louis.  
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1920s 
Portable Gas Caddy
Standard Oil
MAKE
Gas Caddy
MODEL
This portable gasoline caddy from the 1920s allowed vendors to sell and pump gasoline at the curbside. A hand-cranked rotary pump was used to dispense fuel into a customer's vehicle. This gas caddy was donated to the Museum by Standard Oil in 1971.