WORLD CLASS COLLECTION
BROWSE THE ENTIRE TRANSPORTATION COLLECTION (Note: Much of our collection is readily viewable on our grounds; some is in storage or maintenance and thus not. Call ahead if you are visiting for a particular artifact to verify it is on display.)
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1943 
U.S. Army Air Force Douglas Aircraft C-47A “Gooney Bird” #N 3-15635
C-47A Transport "Gooney Bird"
Nickname
Douglas Aircraft Co.
Manufacturer
This twin-engine 1943 Douglas Aircraft product, the military version of the DC-3, is thought to have been used by the United States Army Air Force in the World War II invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944. It is painted in camouflage with invasion stripes, which were placed on Allied aircraft used on D-Day to identify them so they would not be subject to friendly fire. The plane was agile and dependable, and could land and take off on comparatively short air fields. After the war, this plane was used in commercial passenger service in Nevada until it was reacquired by the military for use by the 131st Tactical Fighter Group of the Missouri Air National Guard for 22 years.
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1933 
H.T. Pott Towboat
Towboat
Vessel
St. Louis Shipyard and Steel Co.
Builder
The H.T. Pott was the first Missouri River towboat with a welded steel hull instead of a riveted hull. The vessel operated out of Kansas City, Missouri on the Missouri River.  It is named for Herman T. Pott (1895-1982), a distinguished river transportation executive and entrepreneur.  The groups of barges that are moved on the nation’s rivers are called “tows."  The boats that propel the barges are “towboats” even though they push the barges from the back instead of pulling them.  The H.T. Pott is 58 feet long and 15 feet wide, and it has a “draft” the amount of the hull below the water line of 6 feet. You can walk the decks of the H.T. Pott.
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Bus #1234
New York City
Origin
Fifth Ave. Bus Co.
Make
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1948 
T-33 U.S. Air Force Trainer
T-33
Model
Lockheed Aircraft Company
Make
Lockheed T-33 US Air Force training aircraft. The T-33A was developed by modifying the P-80 jet which later became the “F-80 Shooting Star."  The fuselage of the P-80 was lengthened and a second seat was added which required the use of a larger engine. This design resulted in the T-33A.  Both propeller driven aircraft pilots and the new jet aircraft pilots were trained on the T-33A. The T-33A made its maiden flight in March of 1948.  Manufacture of this plane continued from 1948 to 1959.  The plane has served in the Air Forces of more than 30 countries becoming one of the most widely used trainers in history.
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1905 
1905 Leudinghaus Wagon
Wagon
Leudinghaus Wagon Company
Quality wagons were built by Leudinghaus Wagon Company.
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Pevely Dairy Milk Wagon
Pevely Dairy founded in the 1880s, was one of four large dairies that evolved from a group of small dairies located in St. Louis at the turn of the twentieth century.  Delivery of milk was made by horse-drawn wagons.  Milk was delivered in bottles with cream on top and a round piece of cardboard as a stopper.  Horses were so well trained on their route that they knew when to stop for a delivery.  As a publicity stunt the dairy purchased two trained zebras named Hans and Tanta from a circus and had them pull a dairy wagon. The museum has an original horse-drawn milk wagon that was originally owned by Pevely Dairy. Here is a video of a zebra-drawn milk delivery.
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1890s 
Vintage Steam Roller
The Buffalo-Springfield Roller Co., Springfield, Ohio
Steam roller
The Buffalo-Springfield Roller Co. of Springfield, Ohio, manufactured this vintage three-wheel steam roller. The company formed as a merger of the Buffalo Pitts Co. and the Kelly-Springfield Road Roller Co. (before to 1902 known as the O.S. Kelly Co.) Steam rollers of this sort were used to pave Fifth Avenue in New York City (see Buffalo-Springfield Roller Co. documentation).
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Rail Velocipede
Handcar
Velocipede
Velocipede is French for "swift-footed." Handcar used in 19th and early 20th centuries. The most common early handcar was the four-wheel handcar which weighed about 600 lbs. In addition, there was a far lighter 125-150 pound style of handcar called a velocipede or Irish Mail which was used by some railroads. The three-wheel velocipede could carry one or two people over the rail lines to perform short errands.  It could attain a speed of up to 12 mph. The actual inventor of this style handcar is unknown, but George S. Sheffield has been generally credited with the invention in 1877. This style of handcar was manufactured until approximately 1947.
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U.S. Mail R.F.D. No. 1
Mail wagon
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1957 
Cushman Eagle Scooter
Cushman
Scooter
The Cushman Eagle was an attempt to copy real motorcycle design and it was by far Cushman’s most successful model. The 318CC 8 horsepower motor delivered top speed of nearly 50 MPH. The chrome models are unique because they were made almost exclusively for Shriners to ride in parades and other special events. This scooter was donated in 1987 by the Daniel Hartnett Family.
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Buffalo-Springfield Steam Roller
Buffalo-Springfield
Steam Roller
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1957 
Gyrodyne XRON-1 Rotorcycle
Gyrodyne Company of America
XRON-1 Rotorcycle
In the mid-1950s, advancements in helicopter technology made a vehicle like this possible. At the end of the Korean War, the U.S. Navy was looking for a small sized helicopter that could be dropped to downed pilots stranded behind enemy lines. Gyrodyne Company of America was awarded the contract and built prototypes to demonstrate their new invention. Three different engines were experimented with over the next few years and this model is equipped with a Porsche 4-cylinder internal combustion engine. Demand by the Navy soon switched to radio-controlled pilotless drones and in 1964 all XRON Rotorcycle work ceased. Allan Barklage donated this Rotorcycle to the museum in 1984. Number built 10 Max Speed 78 mph Cruise Speed 60 mph
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1948-51 
Dynacycle Bicycle Kit
Dynacyle
Bicycle Kit
St. Louis-based Dynacycle invented manufactured bike kits and motorbikes. A gasoline motor could be attached to any balloon-tired bicycle in place of the crank and peddles and then mounted to the frame. The company claimed to have the smoothest ride of all bike motors on the market due to its Dynamount suspension system, which included rubber rings in the crank housing. The four horsepower engine delivered speeds of up to 45 miles per hour. This bike has a custom-built side cart. It was used by a local grocery store to deliver goods to its customers. Approximately 200 bikes and kits were sold and it is believed only about 30 are still in existence.
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Barrett Station Depot – Missouri Pacific Railroad
Train Depot
In 1948, the Transport Museum Association (TMA) incorporated as a non-profit educational organization for the purpose of working on the needs of a museum. The land for the museum was acquired at Barrett Station in St. Louis County along the right-of-way of the historic Missouri Pacific Railroad. Included was this historic depot. The original MOPAC single-track with two tunnels were a bottleneck to the double track railroad. The line was moved about 1,000 yards to bypass the tunnels. When the line was relocated in 1944, the area to the left (south) of the track was filled in using rocks and soil removed as the tunnel was replaced by an open cut through the ridge. The depot, although it was moved and is in an area not open to visitors, remains on museum ground and track side of the now Union Pacific Railroad. The current use of the building is a wood working shop and storage area.
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Circa 1920s 
Buda Road Roller #J13218
Buda
Roller
Built by Austin-Western Company, this gasoline-powered road roller shows the transition from the earlier steam-powered roller design to internal combustion power. This equipment was used to compress the soil and crushed rock to form a solid roadbed. Donated to TNMOT in 1981 by Maplewood Construction Company
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Late 1800s-early 1900s 
Tower Grove Road Grader
Western Wheeled Scraper Company
Road Grader
Grader was used in and donated by Tower Grove Park, which is a municipal park in the city of St. Louis, Missouri. Most of Tower Grove Park land was donated to the city by Henry Shaw in 1868. It is on 289 acres adjacent to the Missouri Botanical Garden, another of Shaw's legacies. It extends 1.6 miles from west to east, between Kingshighway Boulevard and Grand Boulevard. It is bordered on the north by Magnolia Avenue and on the south by Arsenal Street. Donated October 4, 2018, to TNMOT Western Wheeled Scraper