WORLD CLASS COLLECTION
BROWSE THE ENTIRE TRANSPORTATION COLLECTION (Note: Much of our collection is readily viewable on our grounds; some is in storage or maintenance and thus not. Call ahead if you are visiting for a particular artifact to verify it is on display.)
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IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1960 
A.C.F.X. #26640
Covered Hopper
TYPE
American Car & Foundry
BUILDER
Hoppers allow unloading by gravity; covered top protects load from moisture and keeps fine materials from blowing away.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1929 
American Refrigerator Transit #52461
Refrigerator Car
TYPE
American Refrigerator Transit
BUILDER
Bunkers at each end of car carried 5 tons of ice to cool produce in summer, or heaters to keep load from freezing in winter; has insulated wood body on steel frame.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1955 
A.T.T.X. #470833
Flatcar
TYPE
Pennsylvania Railroad
BUILDER
Pioneer car in nationwide piggyback service; carried two 36-foot trailers; built for Pennsylvania Railroad.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1969 
Burlington Northern #10032
Caboose
TYPE
Northern Pacific
BUILDER
Extended-vision (width) cupola design; caboose built for Northern Pacific Railway.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1948 
Burlington Northern #10435
Caboose
TYPE
Northern Pacific
BUILDER
All-steel car, built as Northern Pacific #1082; oil heat, electric generator for lights.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1929 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy #75471
Drop-Bottom Gondola
TYPE
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy
BUILDER
Composite construction, with steel under and body framing with wood plank walls; drop doors speed unloading.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1904 
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific #18058
Caboose
TYPE
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific
BUILDER
Wood body on steel frame; survivor of five accidents and rebuildings.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1954 
G.A.R.X. #51000
Refrigerator Car
TYPE
General American Transportation Co.
BUILDER
Cooled, heated by diesel-powered refrigeration system.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1965 
G.A.T.X. #96500 “Whale Belly”
Tank Car
TYPE
General American Transportation Co.
BUILDER
60,000-gallon, 272,700-lb. capacity; welded experimental car; 97-foot length would not clear curves, and 89-foot limit now applies; world’s largest tank car.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1930 
H.P. Hood (G.P.E.X.) #1057
Milk Tank Car
TYPE
General American Transportation Co.
BUILDER
Two stainless-steel tanks hold 6,000 gallons; ran in express trains.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1901 
Missouri-Kansas-Texas #12145
Flatcar
TYPE
American Car & Foundry
BUILDER
Built as boxcar, cut down to flatcar; wood frame car with truss rods; steel center sill added; 34 feet long; 30-ton capacity; part of Katy Flyer train.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1901 
Missouri-Kansas-Texas #12321
Boxcar
TYPE
American Car & Foundry
BUILDER
34-foot wooden car; truss rods with steel center sill; 30-ton capacity; archbar trucks; part of Katy Flyer train.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1904 
Missouri-Kansas-Texas #24420
Gondola
TYPE
Pullman
BUILDER
30-ton capacity; wood frame and body; steel center sill.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1940 
Missouri Pacific #1155
Caboose
TYPE
Missouri Pacific
BUILDER
Steel side-door car without cupola; used in branchline mixed-train service.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1972 
Missouri Pacific #13546
Caboose
TYPE
International Car Company
BUILDER
All-steel with extended-vision (width) cupola; late-model caboose; contains Missouri Pacific Historical Society archives.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1980 
Missouri Pacific #13889
Caboose
TYPE
Missouri Pacific
BUILDER
Late-model caboose; short body with bay windows and large end platforms; used in main line service.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1940 
Monsanto Chemical Company M.C.H.X. #117
Nitric Acid Tank Car
TYPE
American Car & Foundry
BUILDER
Tank car was designed to transport concentrated and highly corrosive nitric acid. Carried 8,000 gallons. A double hulled car with the inner hull constructed of aluminum alloy, which is protected by a cushion of air and a steel outer safety cover shell. Loads and unloads from top.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1921 
Poultry Transportation Company (P.T.C.X.) #423
Poultry Car
TYPE
PTCX
BUILDER
Coops built into car were used to carry live chickens to market; attendant fed and watered them en route from center of car. Also called the "Poultry Palace."
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1938 
Standard Brands S.B.I.X. #1634
Tank Car, Wooden Vinegar Car
TYPE
Fleischmann Transportation Company
BUILDER
This car was built out of cypress and fir wood and holds 8,100 gallons of vinegar. The tank cars were painted silver to reflect sunlight and to help keep the vinegar cool. This type of car had a relatively short track life. Wood was used for these cars as vinegar is acidic and would have been very corrosive to early steel tank cars. Less than six wooden vinegar tank cars remain in existence.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1960 
St. Louis-San Francisco (“Frisco”) #3000
Automobile Carrier
TYPE
St. Louis-San Francisco Railway
BUILDER
First tri-level car for carrying 15 autos from factory to distributor.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1904 
St. Louis Refrigerator Car Co. #3600
Refrigerator Car
TYPE
St. Louis Refrigerator Car Co.
BUILDER
An early steel-framed but wood-bodied car, insulated with horsehair, shredded paper, or wood shavings; carried pre-cooled beer for Anheuser-Busch.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1954 
Spokane, Portland and Seattle #884
Caboose
TYPE
Northern Pacific Railway
BUILDER
All-steel caboose, donated as Burlington Northern #11436
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1984 
TTX Corp. TTOX #130059
Rail Car "Piggyback"
TYPE
United American
BUILDER
This "Front Runner" piggyback car was designed to carry truck trailers. It has four wheels instead of a pair 0f two-axle trucks, 28-inch diameter wheels rather than 33-inch diameter wheels which were standard on most freight cars. It did not have a continuous floor so it could not accommodate containers nor could a trailer be towed aboard by a tractor. The trailer could only be loaded by an overhead crane. The car is 53'10" in length, weighs 25,500 pounds empty, and has a capacity of 65,000 pounds.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1948 
U.R.T.X. #37144
Refrigerator Car
TYPE
General American Transportation Co.
BUILDER
Car #'s 37000, 37095, 37144, 37151, 37439, 37453, 37467, 65104, 67310, 67901, built 1948 - 1954. All steel but still ice-cooled.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1936 
U.T.L.X. #3882
Three Dome Tank Car
TYPE
Union Tank Car
BUILDER
3-dome (compartment) car with 6,000-gallon capacity for carrying petroleum products; tank-on-frame design was the standard for many years.
RAIL: FREIGHT
1951 
Union Pacific #913140
Flatcar
TYPE
Union Pacific
BUILDER
Has one-piece cast steel body from General Steel Castings; UP class F50-15; 50-ton capacity; last used in maintenance-of-way service.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1910 
Union Tank Line #14387
Tank Car
TYPE
Union Tank Car
BUILDER
“Van Dyke” patent frameless tank car using tank with extra stiffening plate on bottom in place of an underframe.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1953 
U.S. Army #38406
Flatcar
TYPE
Major Car Corp.
BUILDER
Heavy-duty flatcar with 6 axles for carrying tanks, other heavy equipment; weighs 35 tons; has 112-ton capacity.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1951-1953 
U.S. Army #370709, #460298, #570329
boxcar, gondola, or flatcar
TYPE
Pressed Steel
BUILDER
Car #'s 370709, 460298, 570329 - Built with European-type couplers and brakes, were used to train soldier railroaders at Weldon Spring, MO; modular cars can be boxcar, gondola, or flatcar.
#370709 - This is a 40 ft. flatcar built in the 1950s.  It is convertible and can be turned into a boxcar, gondola, or flatcar.
#460298 - This is a 40ft. gondola built in the 1950s. It is convertible and can be turned into a boxcar, gondola, or flatcar.
#570329 - This is a 40 ft. flatcar built in the 1950s. It is convertible and can be turned into a boxcar, gondola, or flatcar.
IMAGE
AUTO
1901 
St. Louis Motor Carriage
St. Louis Motor Carriage Co.
MAKE
Carriage Auto
MODEL
This carriage auto originally cost $1,200 and is the oldest of nine of this make in existence. It is powered by a one-cylinder, 7-hp engine; employed the first float carburetor; equipped with a tilting steering wheel; and has a chain drive to the rear axle.St. Louis Motor Carriage Company was a manufacturer of automobiles at 1211–13 North Vandeventer Avenue in St. Louis, Missouri, founded by George Preston Dorris (later credited with developing and patenting the float-carburetor) and John French in 1898, with French taking charge of marketing and Dorris heading engineering and production. St. Louis Motor Carriage was the first of many St. Louis automakers and produced automobiles from 1899 to 1907.
IMAGE
AUTO
1953/1960 
Bobby Darin “Dream Car”
Andy Di Dia
MAKE
Custom Build
MODEL
The Bobby Darin “Dream Car” is a one-of-a-kind custom car designed by Detroit clothing designer Andy Di Dia in 1953 and completed in 1960. Mr. Di Dia apparently did not care for the design of automobiles in the early 1950’s. The Di Dia 150 was hand-built by four workers in Detroit, Michigan between 1953 and 1960 at a cost of over $93,000 dollars.The original Cadillac V8 engine was replaced by a Ford 427/365 hp V8 engine.  The body and chassis are hand-formed in aluminum with an aluminum alloy welded tube frame.  The car has hidden windshield wipers, retracting headlights, swiveling turn signals, and doors that opened with a push on a panel outside of the car (there are no door handles) and a trunk that was hinged from the driver’s side. The Dream Car was also equipped with the first backseat-mounted radio speakers.  The interior is rust-colored to contrast with the ruby colored exterior.  The car has 30 coats of paint with ground industrial diamond dust to add sparkle.Bobby Darin, a well-known singer, purchased the car from Mr. Di Dia, and as a result, it became forever known as Bobby Darin’s Dream Car.
IMAGE
AUTO
1963 
Chrysler Turbine Car
Chrysler Corporation
MAKE
Turbine Car
MODEL
A total of 55 Turbine cars were built by Chrysler Corporation.  The body of the car was handmade by Ghia, an Italian Design Studio, and then shipped to the United States where the engine was installed.  Five cars were built in 1962 as prototypes used for troubleshooting, and each was slightly different from the others.  A total of 50 identical turbine cars were built between October 1963 and October 1964. They were all two-door hardtop coupes with power brakes and power steering.  All were painted identically with a color known as “Turbine Bronze."The engine that powered the turbine car could operate on many different fuels, required less maintenance and lasted longer than the piston engine.
IMAGE
AUTO
1959 
Ford CT-1100 Gas Turbine Truck Tractor
Ford
MAKE
Gas Turbine Tractor
MODEL
In 1952, Ford Motor Co. began a test program to explore the use of gas turbine engines for automobiles and trucks. An improved version of the gas turbine engine was tested in a tilt-cab truck tractor with a 300-horsepower, 704-cubic-inch-displacement engine--this 1959 CT-1100 was the first vehicle used to test it. The main advantages of the turbine engine were low noise, emissions, oil consumption, and vibration; easy cold-weather starting; extended overhaul life; high torque at low speeds; and instantaneous full-power capability. High fuel consumption at idle and costly manufacturing materials needed because of their high operating speeds and temperatures prevented successful turbine use in cars or trucks. Ford gave up development in 1973. This truck tractor was donated by Ford in 1971.
IMAGE
OTHER
1943 
U.S. Army Air Force Douglas Aircraft C-47A “Gooney Bird” #N 3-15635
C-47A Transport "Gooney Bird"
Nickname
Douglas Aircraft Co.
Manufacturer
This twin-engine 1943 Douglas Aircraft product, the military version of the DC-3, is thought to have been used by the United States Army Air Force in the World War II invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944. It is painted in camouflage with invasion stripes, which were placed on Allied aircraft used on D-Day to identify them so they would not be subject to friendly fire. The plane was agile and dependable, and could land and take off on comparatively short air fields. After the war, this plane was used in commercial passenger service in Nevada until it was reacquired by the military for use by the 131st Tactical Fighter Group of the Missouri Air National Guard for 22 years.
IMAGE
OTHER
1933 
H.T. Pott Tugboat
Tugboat
Vessel
St. Louis Shipyard and Steel Co.
Builder
The H.T. Pott was the first Missouri River towboat with a welded steel hull instead of a riveted hull. The vessel operated out of Kansas City, Missouri on the Missouri River.  It is named for Herman T. Pott (1895-1982), a distinguished river transportation executive and entrepreneur.  The groups of barges that are moved on the nation’s rivers are called “tows."  The boats that propel the barges are “towboats” even though they push the barges from the back instead of pulling them.  The H.T. Pott is 58 feet long and 15 feet wide, and it has a “draft” the amount of the hull below the water line of 6 feet. You can walk the decks of the H.T. Pott.
IMAGE
OTHER
XXXX 
Bus #1234
New York City
Origin
Fifth Ave. Bus Co.
Make
IMAGE
OTHER
1948 
T-33 U.S. Air Force Trainer
T-33
Model
Lockheed Aircraft Company
Make
Lockheed T-33 US Air Force training aircraft.The T-33A was developed by modifying the P-80 jet which later became the “F-80 Shooting Star."  The fuselage of the P-80 was lengthened and a second seat was added which required the use of a larger engine. This design resulted in the T-33A.  Both propeller driven aircraft pilots and the new jet aircraft pilots were trained on the T-33A.The T-33A made its maiden flight in March of 1948.  Manufacture of this plane continued from 1948 to 1959.  The plane has served in the Air Forces of more than 30 countries becoming one of the most widely used trainers in history.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1870s 
Bellefontaine Railway Mule Car #33
Mule-Drawn Streetcar
Type
Andrew Wight Car Co.
Builder
Mules pulled this car between downtown St. Louis and Bellefontaine in north St. Louis County until 1895. Passengers entered through the rear door and paid a nickel fare. The car had no heater. In the winter the company spent three cents a day for straw to cover the floor to add warmth for riders. The driver was paid nine-and-and-a-half cents per hour. The mule could only work for six hours per day. The driver worked much longer.The Bellefontaine was long stored by United Railways and St. Louis Public Service Co. Acquired in 1944, the #33 became the first artifact in the Museum's collection.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1893 
Bi-State Development Agency #165
Trolley Passenger Car/Wrecker
Type
Bi-State Development
Builder
Built for Lindell Railway and served as passenger car until 1903; then converted by company shops to wrecker,² retrieving disabled trolleys; used also by United Railways, St. Louis Public Service Co.
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1941 
Bi-State Development Agency #1664
“PCC” Streetcar
Type
St. Louis Car Co.
Builder
President’s Conference Committee (PCC) electric trolley, built for St. Louis Public Service Co.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1945 
Bi-State Development Agency #215 (second)
Rail Grinder
Type
St. Louis Public Service Co.
Builder
This rail grinder was built to replace the earlier 1892 rebuilt streetcar which is currently located at the National Museum of Transportation in Kirkwood, MO. It ran until the end of St. Louis Streetcar Service in 1966.
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1895 
Bi-State Development Agency #60
Trolley Sprinkler
Type
Bi-State Development Agency
Builder
Built for St. Louis & Suburban Railway, sprinkler was first used to keep down dust, later for weed-spraying; also used by United Railways, St. Louis Public Service Co.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1905 
Brooklyn Rapid Transit #1365
Elevated Transit Car
Type
Jewett Car Co.
Builder
Open wooden platform (recovered with steel); semi-convertible; double-ended operation. It is a "Convertible Car;" in summer it ran with open-screened windows. In winter it ran with windows closed and car was heated via a charcoal heater. It weighs 73,230 pounds and seats 60.#1365 was operated with a third rail that produced 600 volts DC which powered two Westinghouse Model 50-L traction motors.Originally ran for Brooklyn Rapid Transit from 1905 - 1923, and then ran for Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit from 1923 - 1940. Next it ran for New York City Board of Transportation from 1940 - 1953. Last operated in service for New York City Transit Authority from 1953 - 1958.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1959 
Chicago Transit Authority #44
Elevated/Subway Rapid Transit Car
Type
St. Louis Car Co.
Builder
Currently Operational. Single-unit version of 6000-series cars listed below; operator’s cab at each end; had both third-rail and trolley pole power pickup. Built by the St. Louis Car Company for Chicago’s elevated and subway lines, using trucks and controls designed for PCC-type streetcars. Some components came from Chicago’s own PCC streetcars which were replaced by electric trolleybuses and diesel buses in the 1950s. Mostly on the Evanston line (today’s Purple Line) until 1993, and came to TNMOT in 1998.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1926 
Chicago Transit Authority #S-1500
Flatcar
Type
Standard Steel Car Co.
Builder
Built to haul truck trailers on Chicago, North Shore & Milwaukee Railroad as #1500; earliest car of this type in modern “piggyback” service.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1924 
Illinois Terminal #104
Interurban/Streetcar
Type
American Car Co.
Builder
Center-entrance door, suburban/interurban, double-ended surface car; used in St. Louis-Alton, Illinois, service.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1924 
Illinois Terminal #410
Electric Railway Passenger Car
Type
St. Louis Car Company
Builder
Illinois Terminal #410 is a suburban car originally built as IT 62. It was assigned to the Illinois Valley Division southwest of Chicago, but was later transferred to St. Louis suburban service. Lightweight steel interurban car; double-ended. It is 46'6" long, and 8'8" wide, with a height of 10'6". Ownership history: Illinois Traction System #62 1924-1929; Chicago & Illinois Valley #62 1929-1930; Illinois Terminal #410 1930-1958.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1908 
Illinois Traction #241
Interurban Combine
Type
American Car & Foundry Company
Builder
#241 was used as a mainline interurban car. It ran for Illinois Traction from 1908-1928 and for Illinois Terminal from 1928 – 1950. Number 241 was retired in 1950. It is constructed of wood and has 48 seats. Illinois Traction became Illinois Terminal RR; heavy, single-ended interurban combine with clerestory railroad roof and arched stained-glass, upper-window sash.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1919 
Kansas City Public Service Co. #1533
Interurban Streetcar
Type
American Car Company
Builder
This car is 27’10” long, 7’8” wide and 9’10” high and weighs 15,400 lbs. It is of steel construction and ran on a gauge of 4’8” track. The car held 28 seats and was last in service in 1949. 4-wheel Birney “safety car;" double-ended.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1909 
Port Authority Trans-Hudson #256
Subway Car
Type
Pressed Steel Car Company
Builder
Formerly Hudson and Manhattan Railroad subway car; could seat 44, with a total capacity 125 standing and seated. The Port Authority Trans-Hudson (PATH) Corporation presents the #256 as the oldest transit car in passenger service between New York and New Jersey, 1909-1965. Car #256 traveled two million miles in revenue service. At the time of its retirement in 1965, it was the only remaining Class B series car on the railroad. Original exterior color was olive green.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1904 
Purdue University Test Car
Interurban Car
Type
Brill
Builder
“Louisiana” Interurban Car. Double-ended interurban car used for engineering testing work by agency of 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair; later rebuilt as electric railway test car for Purdue.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1947 
Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority #2740
“PCC” Streetcar
Type
St. Louis Car Co.
Builder
Currently Operational. Streamlined car built for Philadelphia Transportation Co.; originally 5 foot 2-1/2 inch gauge, converted to 4 foot 8-1/2 inch gauge and restored to operation at TNMOT in 1995-97.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1907 
St. Louis Public Service Co. #1001
Streetcar
Type
United Railways
Builder
Built for United Railways, then to St. Louis Public Service Co.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1909 
St. Louis Public Service Co. #1005
Streetcar
Type
United Railways
Builder
Streetcar #1005 was built for United Railways, then on to St. Louis Public Service Co.; re-motored to pull trailers; also numbered 1065. SLPS car 1005 was a standard car used as a "trailer puller" for years in St. Louis. The car was built in 1909 but was heavily rebuilt during its service life. History: United Railways #1065 1909-1927 / St. Louis Public Service #1065 1927-1947 / St. Louis Public Service #1005 1943-1947 /The National Museum of Transportation (Kirkwood, Missouri) 1947-present.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1946 
St. Louis Public Service Co. #1743
“PCC” Streetcar
Type
St. Louis Car Co.
Builder
Streamlined car sold by PSC to San Francisco Transit Authority and renumbered 1164; loaned to East Troy (WI) RR Museum; now the property of NMOT for an exchange of materials with the City of San Francisco.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1892 
St. Louis Public Service Co. #215 (first)
Rail Grinder
Type
Brownell Car Co.
Builder
The first St. Louis rail grinder numbered 215 was this car, built as a streetcar. A rail grinder is used to smooth trolley track. #215 later saw service as a railway post office car on Bellefontaine Ry, and then as a door repair car. Later #215 was converted to rail grinder in 1910 and ran as such until 1946.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1903 
St. Louis Public Service Co. #2250
Streetcar
Type
St. Louis Car Co.
Builder
Built for St. Louis Transit Co., then to United Railways and St. Louis Public Service Co.; single-ended car.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1921 
St. Louis Public Service Co. #426
Streetcar Trailer
Type
St. Louis Car Company
Builder
#426 was first operated by United Railways (later St. Louis Public Service). Trailer #426 is 45 ft. long, 8 ft. 10 in. wide, and contains 64 seats. It is a motorless streetcar trailer with a steel frame and body with canvas over wood roof and round ends with dual center doors. It was taken totally out of Service in 1948.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1902 
St. Louis Public Service Co. #615
Streetcar
Type
Robertson Car Co.
Builder
Built for St. Louis & Suburban, then used by United Railways and St. Louis Public Service Co.; double-ended car converted to single-ended operation in 1919.
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1921 
St. Louis Public Service Co. #76
Flatcar
Type
United Railways
Builder
Trailer flat car used for street railway maintenance.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1902 
St. Louis Public Service Co. #850
Streetcar
Type
Laclede Car Co.
Builder
Built originally for St. Louis, St. Charles & Western as #3009. It then went to United Railways and finally to St. Louis Public Service Company renumbered as #850. It is a double-ended car.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1896 
St. Louis Public Service Co. #894
Streetcar
Type
Laclede Car Co.
Builder
Rebuilt in 1913 as double-ended car; other in-service numbers were 945 and 855 on United Railways and St. Louis Public Service Co. #894 is an attractive deck-roof streetcar built by the Laclede Car Company in 1896 for the Southern Electric Railway, which later became part of SLPS. It was acquired by the Museum of Transportation near St. Louis in 1947 and during the 1990's was cosmetically restored. History: Southern Electric Railway #945 1896-1898 / United Railways #945 1898-1913 / United Railways #894 1913-1927 / St. Louis Public Service #894 1927-1939 / St. Louis Public Service #855 1939-1947 /National Museum of Transportation (Kirkwood, Missouri) 1947-present. 39'10" in length and 8'3" in width. 8 (B-B) wheels, UR 25 trucks, WH 95 (4) motor.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1914 
St. Louis Waterworks Railway #10
Interurban Car
Type
St. Louis Car Co.
Builder
Currently Operational. Double-ended interurban car; wooden car with steel sides and arched roof; operated from Grand Ave., later Bissells Point, to Chain of Rocks in St. Louis.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1910 
St. Louis Waterworks Railway #17
Interurban Car
Type
American Car Company
Builder
St. Louis Waterworks Railway #17 was a double-ended interurban car, used between Grand Ave., later extended to Bissells Point Station, the City's Baden Water Works Station and Chain of Rocks Water Plant in north St. Louis.  It contained 44 seats.  The roof is constructed of wood with a canvas top over the wood. It was initially retired in 1946, but taken totally out of service in 1959.
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1885 
Union Depot #3
Horsecar
Type
St. Louis Car Co.
Builder
4-window, double-ended horse-drawn car built for unknown user; returned to builder and displayed at 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair, then stored until 1948 donation to NMOT.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1941 
Big Boy #4006 Union Pacific Steam Locomotive
4-8-8-4
TYPE
American Locomotive Company
BUILDER
The "Big Boy" is considered to be the world's largest successful steam locomotive. The locomotive was used to haul the heavy freight trains over the mountains between Cheyenne WY and Ogden UT. The "Big Boy" is an "articulated" engine that is 132 feet 9 1/4 inches long. It weighs 600 tons and could generate a speed of up to 80 mph. The Union Pacific railroad ordered 25 units and, of that number, seven are on static display and one has bee restored and is fully operational.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1858 - 1863 
Boston Providence Railroad Daniel Nason – One of Oldest Surviving Locomotives
4-4-0
TYPE
Boston & Providence Railroad Shops
BUILDER
The "Daniel Nason" is the oldest steam locomotive in the Museum's collection and one of the oldest surviving locomotives in the nation. With a 4-4-0 wheel arrangement, the locomotive is the only surviving "insider," a design popular with railroads before the Civil War, with cylinders and main driving rods between (rather than outside of ) the locomotive side frames. The locomotive had a top speed of 60 mph. Part of the Purdue Collection.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1955 
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific “Aerotrain” #3
Locomotive
General Motors
General Motors used lightweight construction concepts in the building of a futuristic locomotive and 10 cars, which resulted in the "Aerotrain." It was an attempt to lure passengers back to rail travel vs. air or automobile travel. Unfortunately, at high speeds the coaches rode very poorly and were very noisy. Rock Island ultimately used the trains as commuters from Chicago to Joliet, IL.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1939 
Chicago, Burlington & Northern Silver Charger #9908 “Shovel Nose”
Diesel Electric
General Motors Electro-Motive Division
Last "shovel-nosed" diesel made for Zephyr passenger service from St. Louis to Kansas City, MO, and last in service. Named "General Pershing Zephyr" after Missouri native, General John J. Pershing of WWI fame. Streamlined design of earlier "Zephyr Units."
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1950 
#9939A Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Locomotive
Locomotive
General Motors Electro-Motive Corporation
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroads Locomotive. This locomotive operated both long haul passenger and Chicago area commuter service.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1939 
General Motors #103 “The Diesel That Did It”
D Model FTA B-B
TYPE
General Motors Electro-Motive Division
BUILDER
General Motors Electro-Motive locomotive #103 was a demonstrator with 1350 horsepower. First successful diesel electric locomotive. This locomotive proved the efficiency of diesel electric power, ending the steam locomotive era. National Engineering Landmark declared 1982.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1966 
Union Pacific #900081 Rotary Snow Plow
Rotary Snow Plow
TYPE
Union Pacific
BUILDER
This is the largest and heaviest rotary snowplow built. It is 56'2" long, 17' high and weighs 376,400 pounds. (That's the same as 62 African Elephants!) Its 12' diameter cutting wheel could throw snow far to either side of the track as it was pushed forward at four to six mph. Its hydraulically operated wings can open to permit a 14' wide cutting swath of snow. The cutting wheel can revolve up to 150 rpm. It is not self propelled and must be pushed by up to four locomotives.
A steam generator heats the carburetor, prevents the fuel and water pipes from freezing and thaws out the cutting wheel if it gets stuck. The plow engineer controls both the plow and the trailing locomotives.  The circular windows in the front of this plow revolve to keep them clear from snow.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1889 
Reading “Black Diamond” Last One Surviving
2-2-2T Inspection Engine
TYPE
Baldwin Locomotive Works
BUILDER
The "Black Diamond" is the sole surviving steam inspection engine. It was used by the President of Philadelphia & Reading Coal and Iron Co. and other railroad executives on short business or inspection trips. The "Black Diamond" is 22'9" in length and weighs 26,300 pounds. It is believed the engine could attain a maximum speed of 60 mph.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1929 
New York Central #2933 “Mohawk Locomotive”
Steam Locomotive
TYPE
America Locomotive Company
BUILDER
This engine is one of only two large Mohawk type NYC steam engines to have survived being scrapped. It is the only locomotive donated for preservation by the NYC. It weighs 185 tons and has 67" drivers.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1927 
New York & Chicago & St. Louis Railroad Nickel Plate Road Locomotive #170
4-6-4 S Hudson
American Locomotive Company
New York, Chicago, St. Louis Railroad "Nickel Plate Road #170" Steam Locomotive. Number 170 is The oldest surviving "Hudson" locomotive. Passenger locomotive until 1947.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1926 
St. Louis and San Francisco Railway #1522 Locomotive (Frisco)
4-8-2 Mountain
TYPE
Baldwin Locomotive Works
BUILDER
St. Louis-San Francisco Railway #1522 famous steam locomotive (Frisco). Locomotive has booster engine on trailing truck. The engine was used in freight/passenger service. Retired in 1955, it was donated to the Museum. #1522 led 2 lives, restored in 1988 to operating condition and returned to hauling passengers on Midwest excursions from 1988 to 2002.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1896 
Georgia Railroad #724 Locomotive
"Fantail" Steam Locomotive
TYPE
Baldwin Locomotive Works
BUILDER
Last coal-burner steam engine to operate in the St. Louis area. Primary function was to operate as a switch engine for different companies in the area. It was called a "fantail" because of its sloping tender's allowing for greater visibility for the crew. Various parts are colored coded for informational purposes.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1926 
Alton & Southern Railroad #12
0-4-0 Rare 3-cylinder design
TYPE
American Locomotive Company
BUILDER
#12 served the Alton & Southern Railroad for just 22 years, operating 622,626 miles for the industrial switching/transfer line in Illinois. The locomotive's rare 3-cylinder design saved on fuel. Unfortunately, maintenance and associated costs for the center cylinder outweighed the fuel economies. Only four North American 3-cylinder steam engines exist today. #12 weighs 242,000 pounds and has three 22" x 28" cylinders.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1943 
Arkansas & Missouri Railroad #22
Locomotive
TYPE
American Locomotive Company
BUILDER
Arkansas & Missouri Railroad #22 for a time was the oldest operating diesel locomotive in regular mainline service. After being sold a number of times, it finally ended up with the Arkansas & Missouri, where for many years it served as a power unit for the railroad's excursion trains.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1944 
Atchison, Topeka, Santa Fe Railway #5011 Locomotive
2-10-4 S Texas
TYPE
Baldwin Locomotive Works
BUILDER
Built big for Santa Fe, this monster was equipped with 74 inch high driving wheels, largest on any 2-10-4. This steam engine was part of the old Pecos Division of Santa Fe.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1873 
Baltimore & Ohio #173 “Camelback”
4-6-0 Camelback
TYPE
Baltimore & Ohio
BUILDER
The engine is designed for heavy freight use. It features an unusual center-cab "camel" design, with the cab place atop the boiler due to the size of the firebox at the rear.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1929 
Illinois Terminal Railroad #1595
Electric Traction Locomotive Class C
TYPE
Illinois Terminal
BUILDER
Built as a freight locomotive to operate service between downtown St. Louis and Central Illinois, #1595 has a four-truck articulated design which allowed safe weight distribution on bridges which enabled it to negotiate tight curves on city streets. The locomotive is 52 feet in length and weighs 160,000 pounds. It has eight General Electric motors which received 600-volt DC power through a trolley pole from overhead wires. Number 1595 is the sole surviving class C locomotive of the Illinois Terminal Railroad.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1876 
Boston & Albany Railroad #39
4-4-0 American
TYPE
Boston and Albany
BUILDER
The Boston and Albany was a railroad connecting Boston, MA, and Albany, NY. Number 39's a coal-burner called "Mamora" and was nicknamed "Eddy Clock" after the designer, Wilson Eddy. It received its nickname because it was said to run with clock-like precision. It has 63" drive wheels, link-and-pin couplers, a "domeless" boiler and weighs 67,150 pounds. Number 39 is the sole survivor of 100 similar engines built for the Boston and Albany.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1944 
Chesapeake & Ohio Railway #2727
2-8-4 S Kanawhe (Berkshire)
TYPE
American Locomotive Company
BUILDER
Big and powerful Chesapeake & Ohio #2727 was a heavy freight locomotive. This 105-foot locomotive could generate 5000 horsepower, was fast and could pull heavy loads.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1900 
Chicago and Northwestern Railroad #1015
Atlantic 4-4-2
American Locomotive Co.
One of six locomotives built for passenger service on the Chicago and Northwestern. It has 80" drivers and weighs 160,000 pounds. Engine could attain a speed of 100 mph.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1928 
Chicago & Illinois Midland #551
2-8-2 Mikado
TYPE
Lima Locomotive Works
BUILDER
Chicago & Illinois Midland Railroad Steam Locomotive #551 Mikado with a 2-8-2 configuration was big and powerful. During WWII name was changed from Mikado to McArthur. This engine powered coal trains from Illinois Midland Coal Mines to Commonwealth Edison Electric Generating Plants.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1905 
Canadian National #5529
4-6-2 Pacific
Locomotive & Machine Works of Montreal Canadian Branch of ALCO
Steam engine was used in passenger service and weighs 346,030 pounds. Has spoked drive and trailing wheels which were common during early 20th century.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1905 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western #952
4-4-0 American Camelback
American Locomotive
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western #952 steam engine is the only surviving "Mother Hubbard" (or camelback) 4-4-0 type locomotive. The engine burned hard anthracite coal. It was featured in the railroad's "Phoebe Snow" passenger train advertising campaign using the image of a woman dressed in white to illustrate the cleanliness of anthracite coal.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1918 
Eagle-Picher/St. Louis-San Francisco Railway #1621
2-10-0 Decapod
TYPE
Baldwin Locomotive
BUILDER
These engines were originally built for the Imperial Russian State Railways as allied military aid during WWI. After the Bolshevik Revolution took Russia out of the war, #1621 was one of 200 undelivered Decapods. Because Russian railroads had a 5-foot gauge rail compared to the standard American gauge of 4 feet, 8 1/2 inches, the engine had to be modified for American use.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1904 
Illinois Central #764 Locomotive
2-8-0 Consolidation
TYPE
American Locomotive Co.
BUILDER
Originally used in mainline freight service, but was relegated to branch line service due to the weight of trains in later years. Approximately 21,000 units were built, more than any other type.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1890 
Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad “KATY” #311
4-4-0 S American
Baldwin Locomotive Works
Number 311 is the engine that pulled the famous "KATY Flyer," a commemorative train which consisted of a unique series of historic railroad cars:  Caboose#1, Box Car #12321, Coach #10 and Flatcar #12145. This unit of engine and cars was named after the MKT's St. Louis to Texas passenger train. The #311 engine was originally built to burn coal, but it was converted to burn oil in 1923 while undergoing an extensive rebuild. Engine #311 is the sole surviving MKT (KATY) steam engine.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1942 
Norfolk & Western #2156
2-8-8-2 Y6a "Mallet" (Whyte notation)
TYPE
Norfolk & Western Railway Roanoke Shops
BUILDER
Massive freight hauler used until 1960 to haul heavy coal trains through the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia and West Virginia. This compound "articulated" locomotive was among the hardest working steam locomotives ever built. The articulated design allowed the locomotive to operate on tracks with tighter curves by allowing the two sets of drive wheels to split and turn independently.  Weighs 961,500 pounds; the engine and tender are 113'1/4" long and have have 58" drivers. Only compound locomotive in Museum's collection. After being loaned out for five years to the Virginia Museum of Transportation, the #2156 was returned to TNMOT on June 15, 2020.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1943 
Southern Pacific Railroad #4460
4-8-4 GS-6 Type Northern
TYPE
Lima Locomotive Works
BUILDER
Used in freight/passenger service. Has 73" drive wheels, weighs 867,000 pounds, and reached 110 mph. The 4460 pulled last steam-powered train on the SP in 1958. Southern Pacific #4460 is a beautiful streamlined locomotive with a 4-8-4 Northern Configuration. GS Class engine, where "GS" Stands for General Service. Southern Pacific #4460 is the only surviving GS-6 Class steam locomotive. It was built during World War II, but was never painted the famous Daylight paint scheme. Instead, it was painted black and silver, thus earning it the nicknames "War Baby" and "Black Daylight."
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1889 
St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern #635
4-6-0 10-Wheeler
TYPE
Baldwin Locomotive Works
BUILDER
St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern #625, was a 4-6-0 10-Wheeler, also known as Missouri Pacific #2707, built in 1889 by Baldwin Locomotives. This was one beautiful workhorse. Engine #635 was used to haul iron ore from Iron Mountain, MO, to St. Louis. In 1917, due to a merger, the engine became part of the MOPAC Railroad. Weighs 147,300 pounds and has 61" drivers.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1899 
Wabash Steam Locomotive #573
Mogul 2-6-0
TYPE
Rhode Island Locomotive Works
BUILDER
Wabash Locomotive #573 was originally #754. Built in 1899, it was rebuilt in 1915 to the #573 Locomotive 2-6-0 Mogul Class F5. The #573 was built to haul freight. It was used to carry freight across a bridge over the Illinois River at Bluffs, IL, that would not support the heavier diesel locomotives. It is one of only two surviving Wabash steam locomotives.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1873 
Winona & St. Peter #274
4-4-0 American
TYPE
Baldwin Locomotive Works
BUILDER
Winona & St. Peter #274 designated 4-4-0 American was Built by Baldwin Locomotives in 1873 with a 5 Ton Tender Capacity.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1893 
“Charles H” Chicago Lake Street Elevated #9
0-4-4 Forney
Type
Rhode Island Locomotive Works
Builder
One of more than 400 "Forney" steam engines used on elevated transit lines. It ran in Chicago and was named "Charles H" after the son of John Deere of tractor fame and board member of Lake Street Elevated. Forneys were originally built for main line service but were found to be more useful on elevated transit lines or short line railroads. No. 9 is one of only six that are known to exist and the only one preserved in a museum. The Chicago Lake Street Elevated Railroad was the second permanent elevated railroad built in Chicago. Opened in 1893, parts of are still used today.
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RAIL: FREIGHT
1907 
Laclede-Christy #2
0-4-0T (Tank) 30" Narrow Gauge
TYPE
Davenport Locomotive Works
BUILDER
This engine is a coal burner. It has 24" drivers and weighs 24,000 pounds. The original owner sold the engine to the brick making company, Laclede-Christy Clay Products Company, who used it at their St. Louis, MO plant moving carloads of clay to the brick factory. It was retired in 1952.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1910 
National Cash Register #7 Locomotive
0-4-0, 4-Wheel Switcher
TYPE
Lima Locomotive Works
BUILDER
The "South Park" is a fireless locomotive which differs from a steam locomotive. It has no way of producing its own steam. The boiler was filled two-thirds to capacity and then steam was piped in from the central power plant boiler. As the steam in the boiler diminished, the water in the fireless boiler turned into steam. The engine could operate two to two and one-half hours before it had to be refueled with water and steam. The South Park is believed to be one of the first fireless locomotives used in the United States. It is 24'8" in length and weighs 77,700 pounds.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1906 
St. Louis & San Francisco 95/3695 “Frisco”
0-6-0
TYPE
Baldwin Locomotive Works
BUILDER
St. Louis & San Francisco Locomotive 95/3695 "Frisco" was built by Baldwin Locomotive Works 1906 as a 0-6-0 configuration. This switch engine was built originally for the St. Louis - San Francisco Railroad as SL-SF 3695 and used as a railyard switcher. In 1937, it was sold to Scullin Steel Corp. as #95 and used as an industrial switcher.  Scullin Steel donated the engine donated to the Museum in March 1956. Note the unique tender trucks, a Scullin design. The total weight of this coal-fired switch engine is 229,100 lbs.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1916 
TRRA #146 Steam Locomotive
0-6-0
TYPE
TRRA
BUILDER
TRRA #146 Steam Locomotive was a tender-less locomotive with a saddle tank engine, equipped with a horizontal fire door. Museum has frame and running gear only. The cab and boiler were removed prior to #146 arriving at the Museum; the chassis artifact demonstrates gearing. The attached image is one of the engine at the time of its operating. For a photo of the frame that remains of #146 in the Museum's tunnel, click here.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1925 
Union Electric #1 Locomotive
0-4-0
TYPE
Baldwin Locomotive Works
BUILDER
Union Electric #1 Yard Locomotive, built as a 0-4-0 configuration in 1925 by Baldwin Locomotive Works. This engine helped build Missouri’s Bagnell Dam.  The engine weighs 63,000 lbs. Saddle tank switcher steam locomotive.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1940 
Union Electric Locomotive #2
Switcher 0-6-0 Fireless Locomotive
TYPE
Heisler Locomotive Works
BUILDER
#2 is a "Thermos Bottle" or "Fireless" locomotive. The locomotive differs from a regular steam locomotive, because it is incapable of producing its own steam. Designed to be smokeless and safe, expelling no fire or sparks. The boiler is two-thirds filled with water and then steam is injected into the boiler from a central power plant boiler. As the steam dissipates, the water in the fireless boiler is turned into additional steam. The engine weighs 140,000 pounds. #2 was last used at Union Electric's power plant in Venice, Illinois.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1948 
American Steel Foundries #8
D 65-ton B-B Locomotive Switcher
TYPE
Whitcomb Locomotive Works
BUILDER
American Steel Foundries #8 Granite City Works diesel locomotive. Built with four traction motors by Whitcomb in 1948. Diesel electric switcher with two 400 horsepower engines.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1916 
Chicago Burlington & Quincy #1582
Baggage Car Heavyweight
TYPE
American Car & Foundry
BUILDER
Used for baggage mail, express and baggage shipments, 70' long.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1925 
Baltimore & Ohio Oil Locomotive #1
4 Cycle 6 Cylinder "Oil Electric Engine"
TYPE
American Locomotives, General Electric Company & Ingersoll Rand
BUILDER
Baltimore & Ohio Oil Locomotive #1. Powered with a 4 Cycle 6 Cylinder "Oil Electric Engine." Built by American Locomotives, General Electric Company & Ingersoll Rand in Erie PA, 1925 as B&O 8000.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1935 
Baltimore & Ohio #50
1800 horsepower, diesel
Electro-Motive Corporation
One of five experimental passenger diesel locomotives, it hauled Baltimore & Ohio's first diesel-powered Royal Blue service until 1937. In 1938 it was transferred to the Chicago & Alton and then became #1200 under the Gulf, Mobile & Ohio Railroad. It then powered GM&O "Abraham Lincoln" passenger service from St. Louis to Chicago until it was retired in 1958.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1967 
Erie-Lackawanna Railway #3607
SD-45 Diesel-Electric
TYPE
Electro-Motive Division of General Motors
BUILDER
Built as a heavy freight locomotive, and powered by a 645E3 V-20 turbo-charged diesel engine. It was the first V20 engine ever made, overcoming two design challenges: making a very long crankshaft tough enough to take the torque it would endure when in service; and the firing order for 20 cylinders. The engine is 65'8" long, and weighs approximately 391,000 pounds.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1948 
Manufacturers Railway #211
RS-2 Locomotive
TYPE
ALCO
BUILDER
Manufacturers Railway #211 ALCO RS-2 Locomotive built to produce 1000 horsepower by ALCO in 1948.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1955 
Missouri Pacific #4502
RS-3 Diesel Electric Heavy Freight
TYPE
American Locomotive Company
BUILDER
#4502 is one of twelve RS-3s Missouri Pacific bought from ALCO in early 1955. It weighs 229,000 pounds and is 55' 11" long. The engine was sold in 1975 and used as a short line freight engine and later as a switcher. #4502 ALCO RS-3 had a max speed of 65 mph; built by ALCO for heavy freight.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1937 
Sabine River & Northern Railway Locomotive #408
Diesel-electric Switcher Engine Model NC
TYPE
Electro-Motive Corporation
BUILDER
Sabine River & Northern Railway Locomotive painted in Bumble Bee colors; engine had 900 horsepower Winston Model 201-A engine, cast frame, with top speed of 50 mph. This Model NC diesel-electric switcher cost $91,500.00 and weighs 250,000 pounds.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1966 
Union Pacific #2804 Cutaway Education Locomotive
Diesel engine prime mover U28C
TYPE
General Electric Transportation System
BUILDER
Union Pacific #2804 Cutaway Locomotive, Locomotive Body is Off Showing Locomotive's Engine and Equipment, Engine is Cut open Showing Engine Functions and Cylinder Size.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1917 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy #6117
80' Day Coach
Pullman
Heavyweight construction, six-wheel trucks
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1914 
U.S. Mule #662
Mule
TYPE
General Electric
BUILDER
In 1914, to operate on the Panama Canal, 40 mules were built by GE. #662 is one the mules, named after the pack animals. Mules were used for side-to-side and braking control through the locks. Four mules were used per ship, one on each side and one on each end. They each cost $13,092 and were used on the Pacific side of the canal at the Pedro Miguel locks. They each weighed 86,300 pounds and were 32'-2 1/4" in length. The mule ran on 5' gauge rails.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1936 
Joplin-Pittsburg #2003
Propane Electric Engine Short Line
TYPE
Plymouth Locomotive Works
BUILDER
Built at the Plymouth Locomotive Works of Plymouth, Ohio, #2003 is a propane-electric unit used in short line freight service on the Joplin-Pittsburg Railroad and later on the Kansas City Public Service Freight Operation as # 1. It weights 140,000 pounds, has a maximum speed of 35 mph, and contains four 110 horsepower Westinghouse motors. In 1964, #2003 was donated by James G. Ashley, Sr. of Kansas City Public Service Freight Operation.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1939 
Illinois Terminal #206 “Dinky”
Railbus
White Motor Co.
Original school bus was converted by Illinois Terminal for use as a railbus. Special type of rear axle, flanged wheels and a 4-wheel front bogie truck. Nicknamed "The Dinky." Used to transport passengers between Grafton, IL and Alton, IL. Engine, line 2; gas straight 6 cyl, 6 volt. Donated in 1953 by the Illini Railroad Club.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1918 
Illinois Terminal Railroad System #1575
Locomotive Boxcab Class B
TYPE
Illinois Traction System
BUILDER
One of two Class B locomotives preserved is #1575 used on an electric freight line, one of the last B's built which used a cast steel underframe. It operated in freight service across the Illinois Traction System, and later Illinois Terminal. The country's second largest interurban network was the Illinois Traction System - the McKinley lines - that stretched across much of the state of Illinois and lasted into the late 1950's. The ITS shops in Decatur were perhaps best known for the large fleet of boxcab locomotives that were designed and built entirely in-house. The earliest of these homebuilt units were the Class B's.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1892 
GE-1
Electric Locomotive
Type
General Electric
Builder
First electric locomotive. Located in TNMOT's streetcar barn.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1922 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy #1942
Railway Post Office
TYPE
Standard Steel Car Company
BUILDER
Baggage - mail heavyweight. Mail was retrieved, sorted and dropped off without the train having to stop.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1919 
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific #E-2
Electric Bi-Polar
General Electric
Generating up to 3,200 continuous horsepower, #E-2 was used primarily to pull transcontinental passenger trains (including the famed Olympian Hiawatha) between Othello and Tacoma, WA, through the Cascade mountains. The 76-foot long electrically powered locomotive, weighing 260 tons, is the only survivor of five built for the Milwaukee Road. “Bi-polar” engines used a special motor to operate electrically. It was called a "bi-polar" design because of the two motor field magnet cores, one on each side of the motorized axles. Dual-facing engine.  They were designed to pull passenger cars.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1906 
New York Central #113
Class S-2 Electric Locomotive
American Locomotive Co. and General Electric
Primary function was to haul passenger trains on electrified tracks between New York City's Grand Central Station and Harmon, NY. The locomotive operated on 660 volts DC and produced 2,200hp. Power was obtained by an "electrified" third rail, but used a small pantograph on top of the engine to receive power from overhead wires when operating in NYC's Park Avenue tunnel. This type of locomotive served as the prototype for Lionel and Ives model trains.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1924 
City of St. Louis Water Division #1
15-ton Switcher
TYPE
Whitcomb Locomotive, Rochelle, IL
BUILDER
Mechanical drive; clutch and four-speed transmission. This engine was originally powered by gasoline but later changed to a three-cylinder, 87 horsepower diesel engine. The dome on the top is a sand dome.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1899 
Arkansas & Missouri #102
Baggage-Coach Combination
Boston & Maine RR
Arkansas & Missouri #102 baggage-coach combo (1899) built by Boston & Maine RR
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1916 
Duluth, Missabe & Northern #502
2-10-2 Santa Fe
TYPE
Baldwin Locomotive Works
BUILDER
#502 was designed for heavy freight operations on ore trains. It weighs 346,600 pounds and has 59" drivers. During the 1920s numerous upgrades were made to the engine including a larger tender which included a "dog house" for the brakeman. In 1937, #502 transferred to the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range to haul ore trains from the Missabe Range to Lake Superior.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1953 
USAX B-2069 – U.S. Army
Multi-gauge trucks
TYPE
Alco/GE Diesel MRS-1
BUILDER
The nose of this Alco/GE diesel belies its multi-gauge trucks that are able to run on almost any gauge in the world. This Alco/GE diesel was built with multi-gauge trucks for service anywhere in the world in the event of war. A total of 96 were built. Most of the locos produced were put into storage to await a worldwide need.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1873 
Chicago and Northwestern #274
4-4-0
TYPE
Baldwin
BUILDER
Chicago and Northwestern steam locomotive (1873) 4-4-0. It was donated by Perdue University in 1951.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1913 
St. Louis Southwestern Railroad (Cotton Belt) MW #95589
Wedge Snow Plow (converted from Vanderbilt tender)
TYPE
Baldwin Locomotive Works
BUILDER
Number 95589 was originally built as a "Vanderbilt" tender to a Rock Island 2-8-2 "Mikado" engine. It was rebuilt in the mid-1920s to a water tank car, and then in 1957 converted to a snow plow. One-third of the tank was removed and a fabricated wedge was attached to the tank. Remaining two-thirds of the tank was filled with ballast to add weight and stability to the plow. One or more engines pushed the plow through snow. Originally built for the Rock Island Line, it was conveyed to the St. Louis Southwestern when the former line was sold and broken up.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1833 
Boston & Providence Railroad Coach
Railway passenger coach
Boston & Providence Railroad
The stage coach-style passenger coach of Boston & Providence Railroad was designed and built by John Lightner in Boston & Providence Railroad shops. The Boston & Providence Railroad Coach is the oldest original American railway passenger coach. Built in 1833, resembling an early stagecoach, it has four wheels and is constructed of wood, with an iron frame and leather straps supporting the body. The car was made three years after the first U.S. Steam locomotive was built in 1830. At first horse-drawn, it was later pulled behind the first steam engine that traveled between Boston, MA and Providence, RI. The coach was exhibited with the "Daniel Nason" locomotive at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago (1893) and in New York (1939-1940). In 1982, it was among 8,500 items auctioned from the estate of a wealthy businessman. That year it was contributed to the Museum by the "Friends of the Danbury Collection."
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RAIL: FREIGHT
1952 
U.S. Army #1149
Experimental Gas-Turbine
TYPE
Davenport-Besler Corp.
BUILDER
An experimental gas turbine engine powered by two Boeing 502-2E 150 horsepower jet engines. Developed for the Korean Conflict. This is the first successful gas-turbine-mechanical locomotive, built for the Army as an experimental by Davenport.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1926 
Terminal Railroad Association (TRRA) #318
0-8-0 Switch Engine
TYPE
Terminal Railroad
BUILDER
Terminal R. R. was incorporated in 1889 to rationalize the interchange of freight and passenger trains in the St. Louis MO area. This switcher was the first engine to be built with a one-piece frame and cylinder casting. A coal burner of 247,500 pounds, it has 51" drivers. It is the only TRRA steam locomotive to have survived.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1952 
Wabash #2847 Caboose
Caboose
TYPE
Wabash Railroad
BUILDER
End cupola restored over a four-year period by Vance C. Lischer, Jr. and then donated to TNMOT.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1947 
MoPac #604 Railbus
Railbus
Fageol Twin Coach
Built to replace electric cars on the Houston & North Shore operation. Fageol Twin Coach on flanged wheels, Model 41-SRC (Single Rail Car).
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1942 
St. Joe Minerals Mine Train
Mine Train, 8-tonner
TYPE
Goodman Equipment Corp.
BUILDER
Mine ore engine; 2" gauge mining locomotive.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1931 
Pennsylvania Railroad #4700
P5 2-C2 Electric Locomotive
TYPE
Pennsylvania Railroad
BUILDER
#4700 was built in 1931 as the prototype of the P-5 class electric locomotive. Originally designed for passenger service, the #4700 could attain a top speed of 95 mph. In 1939 it was re-geared to perform freight work, with a top speed of 70 mph. #2700 is 62 feet long and weighs 392,000 pounds. The locomotive operated off of 11,000 volt, single phase AC power collected from overhead wires. 64 units were built with the boxcab placing the engineer at the front of the engine which was very dangerous in the event of an accident. 28 units were later built with the cab in the center. Number 4700 is the sole surviving P-5 Pennsylvania Railroad electric engine.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1942 
Pennsylvania Railroad #4918
GG1 Class 2-C+C-2 Electric Locomotive
General Electric Baldwin Locomotive Works Pennsylvania Railroad
Pennsylvania Railroad used GG1s like #4918 to pull passenger trains in the Washington to New York City "Northeast Corridor." Amtrak acquired the locomotive in 1971 and renumbered it #4916. #4918 weighs 477,000 pounds and is 79'6" long. 11,000-volt AC power was supplied by overhead wires through dual pantographs located at either end of the engine. A GG1 could attain a top speed of 100 mph in passenger service and 90 mph in freight service.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1926 
Pullman Co. St. Carvan
Sleeping Car "Open Section"
Pullman Co.
This 12 section/one drawing room car known as an "open section" sleeping car was the most common and more economical type of sleeping car accommodation on U.S. railroads. During the 1930s the St. Carvan was air-conditioned with the Pullman air-conditioning system which was a block of ice placed under the car with a large fan located in front of the ice. As the wheels turned, electricity was generated to turn the fan which blew air over the ice resulting in cool air inside the car.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1971 
Union Pacific Railroad #6944 “Centennial”
D Model DD40AX DD Centennial
TYPE
General Motors Electro-Motor Division
BUILDER
Number 6944 is one of 47 engines built between 1969 and 1971 for the Union Pacific. This class of engine was called "Centennial" to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad. This type of "double" engine was the most powerful diesel-electric locomotive model ever built on a single frame. It was actually two engines on one frame. #6944 was used to haul heavy freight over the Rocky Mountains. Number 6944 is 98'5" in length and weighs 543,432 pounds with a full load of fuel and fluids. The two engines generate 6,600 horsepower and can attain a top speed of 80-90 mph.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1938 
Chicago Burlington & Quincy #192 “Silver Spoon”
Silver Spoon Dining Car
Edward G. Budd Mfg. Co.
The "Silver Spoon" #192 is a stainless steel, fluted-side dining car which was to be used on the CB&Q Zephyr trains. It was assigned to operate on the "Aristocrat" between Chicago and Denver. The "Silver Spoon" was destined to be used as a spare car in the general service pool of the Zephyr fleet. The dining car is equipped with two coal-fired stoves, ice chests for refrigeration, and sealed windows. The car could seat 36 to 48 diners.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1952 
U.S. Army #2002
Diesel Electric D Model SW8 BB
TYPE
General Motors Electro Motors Division
BUILDER
#2002 has an 800 hp, two-cycle diesel V-8 engine and is 44'5" in length. It weighs 230,000 pounds and has a maximum speed of 65 mph. The U.S. Army ordered 41 SW8 engines for service in Korea during the Korean Conflict. The #2002 served with the 724th Transportation Railway Operating Battalion in Korea. At the end of the war #2002 was returned to the United States and operated at the Red River (Texas) Army Depot and later at Fort Leonard Wood, MO.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1935 
Gulf, Mobile & Ohio Railroad #5998
Parlor-Observation Car Abraham Lincoln
American Car & Foundry
#5998 is a lightweight aluminum, round-end parlor observation car originally built for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. It brought up the rear of the B&O's "Royal Blue" passenger train that provided service from Washington, D.C., to Jersey City, NJ. In the early 1940s it was operated by the GM&O where it was assigned to the "Abraham Lincoln" passenger service between Chicago, IL, and St. Louis, MO. The car is 70' in length and weighs 83,200 pounds which is 10,000 pounds less than a heavyweight car made out of steel. The car is air-conditioned and equipped with restrooms. It has 32 individual seats.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1943 
Illinois Central #30
Dynamometer Car
TYPE
Illinois Central Railroad
BUILDER
A "dynamometer" car is a rolling laboratory designed to test the pulling power of steam locomotives. Number 30's front coupler was attached to the car's underframe through a hydraulic cylinder. The pull of a locomotive moved a piston in the cylinder, and measuring instruments inside the car recorded data. #30, a steel car, is 60 feet long and weighs 125,000 pounds. Test trips on the car could last for several days, and as a result, the car contains facilities to house and feed the test crew and a dining car cook: two staterooms for four people each lockers, toilet, shower, and kitchen.
IMAGE
AUTO
1923 
Stanley Steamer
Steam Car - Similar to an 8-cylinder internal combustion engine
MAKE
Stanley Motor Carriage Co.
MODEL
Stanley steam cars utilized an external combustion engine where the fuel source is consumed external to the engine. A steam boiler generates great quantities of power for later use, unlike an internal combustion engine that must develop the needed power on demand. Kerosene was used to light the pilot and main burner of the external engine as it provided more heat energy than gasoline. Kerosene was also less expensive and safer. It would take at least 20 minutes to start a Stanley Steamer. Fuel consumption was approximately one gallon of water per 10 to 12 miles.
IMAGE
AUTO
1912 
Pierce 4 Motorcycle
Motorcycle 4-cylinder
MAKE
Pierce Motorcycle Co. (Parent company was Pierce-Arrow Motor Car Co.)
MODEL
The Pierce 4 was the first 4-cylinder motorcycle produced in the United States. It has a T-head, inline-4 with compression release 708cc engine with a two-speed transmission and could attain a speed of 60 mph. The frame of the Pierce has very large diameter partitioned integrated tubing for gasoline and oil.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1925 
Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad #970
Heavyweight Dining Car “City Tavern”
Pullman Company
The “City Tavern” is simply a restaurant on wheels.  The car is divided into two areas, the galley where the food was prepared and the dining area known as the “pantry” where up to 40 patrons could be seated.  Eleven or twelve employees would be assigned to the car: the steward in charge of the diner, 3 or 4 cooks, 2 dishwashers, and 6 waiters.  Dining car employees were not allowed to accept tips.  The car was modified during the 1930’s with the patented Pullman air-conditioning system.
IMAGE
RAIL: PASSENGER
1948 
Chicago Burlington & Quincy #482
 8-6-3-1 Sleeper “DuBuque”
Pullman Company
Although owned by the CB&Q, the “DuBuque” was used in pool service on the Northern Pacific R.R.’s “North Coast Limited." This is a typical post World War II lightweight sleeper.  The car consisted of 6 roomettes for 1 person, 4 rooms for 2 people, 3 rooms with double beds, and 1 large compartment.
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AUTO
1957 
1957 Chevy Bel Air
Chevrolet
MAKE
Bel Air
MODEL
The 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air model is the upscale model and is a popular, sought after classic car. The '57 Chevy, as it is often known, is an auto icon.
IMAGE
AUTO
1964 
1964 1/2 Ford Mustang
Ford
MAKE
Mustang
MODEL
In 1961, Ford General Manager Lee Iacocca aimed to sell a sports car with four seats, low weight, and a price tag under $2,500. In 1964, Iacocca's vision became a success with the introduction of the Ford Mustang. After selling more than 22,000 Mustangs on the first official sale date, Ford proved that it could manufacture an affordable sports car that the average American family could enjoy. It sports a 200 cubic inch, inline 6 cylinder engine; 108 inch wheelbase. Built in Dearborn, MI; price new $2,372. The new car was introduced to the public on April 17, 1964 at the New York World's Fair.This 1964 1/2 Mustang holds a coveted spot in American muscle car history, as it was the first generation of Ford Mustangs to be produced. Mustangs remain a "classic" American car to this day.
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OTHER
1905 
1905 Leudinghaus Wagon
Wagon
Leudinghaus Wagon Company
IMAGE
OTHER
 
Pevely Dairy Milk Wagon
Pevely Dairy founded in the 1880s, was one of four large dairies that evolved from a group of small dairies located in St. Louis at the turn of the twentieth century.  Delivery of milk was made by horse-drawn wagons.  Milk was delivered in bottles with cream on top and a round piece of cardboard as a stopper.  Horses were so well trained on their route that they knew when to stop for a delivery.  As a publicity stunt the dairy purchased two trained zebras named Hans and Tanta from a circus and had them pull a dairy wagon. The museum has an original horse-drawn milk wagon that was originally owned by Pevely Dairy. Here is a video of a zebra-drawn milk delivery.
IMAGE
AUTO
1951 
Chrysler New Yorker Station Wagon
Chrysler
MAKE
New Yorker Wagon
MODEL
The Chrysler New Yorker 4 door station wagon was introduced in January 1951.  Chrysler produced only a total of 251 units of this model.The New Yorker was powered by a 331 cubic inch (5.4 liter) 180 hp Hemi V-8 engine called the “Firepower” engine.  It was also equipped with power steering which was an industry first.  The New Yorker also had fold down rear seats to provide more cargo space.Statistically, the New Yorker was 213.25 inches in length, 75.125 inches in width, and had a 131.5-inch wheelbase.  Its top speed was approximately 98 mph, and fuel consumption was 10.9 mpg.The original manufacturer’s suggested retail price for the New Yorker Wagon was $4026.00.
IMAGE
AUTO
1937 
1937 Chevrolet
Chevrolet
MAKE
MODEL
IMAGE
AUTO
1917 
1917 Chevrolet
Chevrolet
MAKE
MODEL
Wooden frame
IMAGE
AUTO
1912 
1912 Traffic Truck
MAKE
Traffic Truck
MODEL
Built in St. Louis.  22 horsepower gave it a top speed of 12 miles per hour.
IMAGE
AUTO
1908 
Galloway GT Farm Wagon/Truck
Galloway
MAKE
Truck
MODEL
The William Galloway Company of Waterloo, Iowa, had been a farm implement dealership and mail-order supplier of small farming equipment and tools before it introduced its line of trucks in 1908. The Galloway GT was marketed as a dual-purpose vehicle, "drive to church on Sunday and be put back to work on Monday." This unrestored truck features a two-cylinder, chain-driven, water-cooled engine. Research reveals it to be the oldest surviving delivery truck used in the city of St. Louis and one of fewer than ten Galloways to survive.Engine Type: 2 cylinderHorsepower: 14Displacement: 142 Cubic inchesPrice New: $570.00Donated to the Museum in 1972 by William Abbott.
IMAGE
OTHER
1890s 
Vintage Steam Roller
The Buffalo-Springfield Roller Co., Springfield, Ohio
Steam roller
The Buffalo-Springfield Roller Co. of Springfield, Ohio, manufactured this vintage three-wheel steam roller. The company formed as a merger of the Buffalo Pitts Co. and the Kelly-Springfield Road Roller Co. (before to 1902 known as the O.S. Kelly Co.) Steam rollers of this sort were used to pave Fifth Avenue in New York City (see Buffalo-Springfield Roller Co. documentation).
IMAGE
AUTO
1915 
Model T Ford Touring Car
Ford
MAKE
Model T Touring Car
MODEL
The Model T had a front mounted 177 cubic inch inline four-cylinder engine producing 20 hp for a top speed of 40-45 mph. The cost of a 1915 Model T was approximately $390 dollars.Henry Ford’s approach to the Model T design was one of getting it right and never changing.  He believed the Model T was all the car a person would ever need.  However, there were design changes. For example, in 1915 the hood design retained the five-sided design but louvers were added to the vertical sides, and electric headlights replaced carbide headlights.In 1917 Ford ceased production of the Model T and began production of the Model A. Model T engines were produced until 1941.
IMAGE
AUTO
1890 
Hearse
MAKE
MODEL
IMAGE
AUTO
1919 
Dorris 6-80 Panel Truck
Dorris
MAKE
Truck
MODEL
AUTO
1904-05  
A. L. Dyke Steam Car
A. L. Dyke Auto Supply Company
MAKE
Steam Car
MODEL
Steam Kit Car by A. L. Dyke Auto Supply Company.Established in St.Louis MO in 1899 by A.L.Dyke (Andrew Lee Dyke), Dyke was the first American auto parts business. Dyke also sold early autos, kit car or assembled. In addition to the Dyke name, the company also sold automobiles under the St. Louis (St. Louis Motor Company) and Dyke-Britton names.
IMAGE
OTHER
 
Rail Velocipede
Handcar
Velocipede
Velocipede is French for "swift-footed." Handcar used in 19th and early 20th centuries.The most common early handcar was the four-wheel handcar which weighed about 600 lbs.In addition, there was a far lighter 125-150 pound style of handcar called a velocipede or Irish Mail which was used by some railroads. The three-wheel velocipede could carry one or two people over the rail lines to perform short errands.  It could attain a speed of up to 12 mph.The actual inventor of this style handcar is unknown, but George S. Sheffield has been generally credited with the invention in 1877. This style of handcar was manufactured until approximately 1947.
IMAGE
AUTO
 
Indian Motorcycle
Indian
MAKE
Motorcycle
MODEL
IMAGE
OTHER
 
U.S. Mail R.F.D. No. 1
Mail wagon
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1921 
St. Louis Public Service Streetcar #742
Streetcar
Type
St. Louis Car Company
Builder
SLPS 742 is one of the Peter Witt type streetcars built for St. Louis in the 1920s by St. Louis Car Company. This view shows the back end of the single-ended car. It was rebuilt during its lifetime with different windows and foot-pedal brakes. History: United Railways #742, 1921-1927 / St. Louis Public Service #742, 1927-1953. The car has been at the National Museum of Transportation since 1953 and is stored in complete and fair condition. It has a canvas roof over a wood roof, round ends, single-ended; originally had conductor at center door to collect fares.  Length 50'7," width 8'10." Wheels 8 (B-B), 140 hp, Commonwealth trucks, WH 510A (4) motor.
IMAGE
RAIL: INTERURBAN
1900 
Bi-State Development Agency #77 Line Car
Line Car
Type
Home-built, United Railways
Builder
Car was used to repair overhead trolley wires; originally refrigerator car of United Railways, then to St. Louis Public Service Co. Home-built line car, 41' long by 7'3" wide, 4'8.5" gauge, runs on 600VDC; K12 controller with four WH 56 motors, 200 HP total; straight air brakes. United Railways in 1900; United Railways refrigerator car "Z" (1902-1913); United Railways #77 (1913-1927); St. Louis Public Service #77 (1927-1963); Bi-State Development Agency #77 (1963-1966). Donated by Bi-State Development Agency in 1966.  
IMAGE
AUTO
1969 
Fire Bug
Firetruck
MAKE
George Barris, Barris Custom Cars
MODEL
Fire Bug was a a car-sized fire truck. First used by the Los Angeles Fire Department, it was later driven by the zany Banana Splits characters in a TV show, "The Banana Splits Adventure Hour."
The original plan was for this creation, the Fire Bug, to be a promotional or parade rig for the Los Angeles City Fire Department during Fire Prevention Week and such, even though it lacks the departmental markings you might expect. It was a 1969 collaboration between George Barris and his partner-of-the-moment, Dick Dean. Mechanically, it's a chopped-pan Volkswagen Microbus, oddly fitted with dual rear wheels.
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IMAGE
AUTO
1912 
Overland 61-T
Overland
MAKE
61-T
MODEL
Overland 61-T automobile owned by the Museum which had been used in the film, "The Great Race," starring Jack Lemmon, Tony Curtis, and Natalie Wood, inspired by the actual 1908 New York to Paris race.
IMAGE
AUTO
1911 
Hudson Model 33 Touring Car
Hudson
MAKE
Model 33 Touring Car
MODEL
Hudson Model 33 Touring car once owned by W.C. Fields.
IMAGE
AUTO
1913 
Cartercar Model 5 Roadster
Cartercar
MAKE
Model 5 Roadster
MODEL
Cartercar Model 5 Roadster used in the 1965 film, "The Great Race," inspired by the actual 1908 New York to Paris race.
IMAGE
AUTO
1931 
Adolphus Bus
Yellow Truck and Coach Division of General Motors
MAKE
Bus
MODEL
The Yellow Truck and Coach of GM built this parlor coach as the ultimate in highway travel. The exterior appearance is that of a conventional Z-250 model passenger bus; however, this proto RV offers all the comforts of home with air conditioning, Pullman berths, a kitchen telephone, and lavatory including a shower. It was typically operated by a crew of three.The bus designed initially used by the president of Buick Motor Division. It was later purchased by Anheuser-Busch of Saint Louis, Missouri, where it provided August A. Busch Jr. first class transportation o numerous trips across the country (1941-1946). Inline 6-cylinder, 616 cid, 150 hp., wheelbase: 250," built in Pontiac MI, acquired by Museum in 1969.
IMAGE
AUTO
 
BiState Development Agency Bus #7063
MAKE
Bus
MODEL
Donated to Museum in 1996 by Bi-State Development Agency.
IMAGE
AUTO
 
St. Louis Public Service #4878
Yellow Coach Division of General Motors
MAKE
Model TDH 4006 City Transit Bus
MODEL
IMAGE
AUTO
1938 
Lincoln Willoughby Model K Touring Car
Lincoln
MAKE
Willoughby Model K Touring Car
MODEL
Lincoln Willoughby Model K Touring Car used to chauffeur dignitaries at the New York 1939 World's Fair.
IMAGE
AUTO
1962 
Ghia L6.4
Ghia
MAKE
L6.4
MODEL
Ghia L6.4 once owned by Dean Martin.
IMAGE
AUTO
1998 
1998 Reynard Champ CART-series Race Car
Hogan Racing
MAKE
Reynard Champ CART-series Race Car
MODEL
St. Louis based Hogan Racing raced this CART-series car in 1998 which features a fiber, Kevlar reinforced body. In its racing condition, a Mercedes-Benz engine powered the 1,525 pound car at speeds of over 200 miles per hour. Hogan Racing fielded several future superstar drivers, including future Indy 500 winner Helio Castroneves, who raced this car and for whom this car is lettered. The Reynard showcases Hogan's St. Louis heritage by featuring the logos of the St. Louis Cardinals, Blues, and former Rams. It was used as a show and exhibit car following its retirement from racing. Engine Type: V8; displacement: 161.5 CI; 850 hp; wheelbase: 119.5 inches
IMAGE
AUTO
 
Crosley Auto
Crosley Motors Inc.
MAKE
MODEL
Engine Type: 4 cylinder, Crosley COBRAHorsepower: 26.5Wheelbase: 80"
IMAGE
AUTO
1954 
Willys Fire Truck 1955 – Emerson Fire Department
Willys and Valley Equipment
MAKE
Firetruck
MODEL
Built 1954, by Willys in Toledo, OhioBody made by Valley Equipment, Bay City, MichiganFour wheel drive
IMAGE
AUTO
1963 
Divco Retail-Delivery Milk Truck
Detroit Industrial Vehicles Company
MAKE
Delivery Truck
MODEL
Divco was a brand name of delivery trucks built and marketed in the United States. Divco is an acronym which stands for Detroit Industrial Vehicles Company.Built in 1963, this model may be driven standing or sitting. When standing, the throttle and brake were mounted on the steering column. This model has a Ford engine. It was used by Bailey Dairy until the early 1980s.Divco was known for its multi-stop delivery trucks, particularly in use as home delivery vehicles by dairy producers.
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AUTO
1925 
Autocar Lumber Truck
Autocar Company
MAKE
Lumber Truck Model 27K
MODEL
This Autocar truck was donated to the Museum in 1961, three years after it went out of service. At that time the president of Maplewood Planing Mill Co., Alan C. Blood, said that when his father purchased the truck for the company in 1925. He partially paid for it "by trading in a team of horses, a wagon, and a half carload of hay." In its thirty-three years of service this truck hauled countless thousands of board feet of lumber from the Missouri Pacific's Greenwood Boulevard tracks to the Maplewood Mill at 2731 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood MO, about a half-mile away. It has a three-ton capacity.Model:  27KEngine Type: 4 cylinderHorsepower: 25Displacement: 276 cubic inchesPrice New: $3,550.00Built in: Ardmore PAThe Autocar Company is an American specialist manufacturer of severe-duty, Class 7 and Class 8 vocational trucks started in 1897 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as a manufacturer of Brass Era automobiles, and trucks from 1899, Autocar is the oldest surviving motor vehicle brand in the Western Hemisphere.Donated to Museum in 1961 by Maplewood Planing Mill Company.
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AUTO
Circa 1912-1913 
Chase Model D Express Mail Truck
Chase
MAKE
Mail Truck
MODEL
This is believed to be the first truck used to haul mail in the State of Alabama. The Chase Motor Truck Company was founded in 1907, and its three-cylinder engine was used beginning in 1910. The truck has a three-cylinder, two-stroke, air-co0led, 20 horsepower engine, is chain-driven, and has a load capacity of 1,500 pounds. Price new $900; built in Syracuse NY. Museum acquired the truck in 1972 from donor Robert W. Abbott.
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AUTO
1920 
Chicago Derrick Truck
Chicago Truck Company
MAKE
MODEL
This Chicago truck was an "assembled" vehicle that was created using components from various suppliers; it was a common practice, with dozens of brands manufacturing trucks in the United States. The Chicago truck company was founded in 1906 for the sale and maintenance of trucks and built its first vehicle in 1919. The firm was out of business by 1932. Featuring a four-cylinder Hercules engine with a chain drive, and solid tires, this truck was used for many years by the donor for transporting fuel tanks.Engine Type: 4 cylinder HerculesHorsepower: 27Displacement: 251 Cubic inchesPrice New: $2,290.00Built in: Chicago ILDonated to Museum Of Transportation in 1964 by Standard Oil Company of Indiana.
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AUTO
1919 
Ford Model TT Truck
Ford
MAKE
Model TT Truck
MODEL
The Model TT was a one-ton truck that derived from a Model T car chassis; it utilized a stronger frame, heavier rear axle, and the addition of two rear springs.  The truck debuted in 1917 selling for $600.00.  Ford only sold the engine and the chassis leaving it up to the buyer to either custom complete the truck cab and body themselves or pay a coach builder to finish it for them. By the 1920's Ford added the option of a cab, which cost another $45-$65.The versatility of the TT made it useful to farmers and merchants; as fire trucks, dump trucks, and passenger vehicles.  By 1928, 1.3 million Ford Model TTs had been sold.This truck arrived at the museum in 1997 in several crates. A team of dedicated volunteers re-assembled and restored it.Engine Type: 4 cylinderHorspower: 20Displacement: 176.7 cubic inchesPrice New: $550.00Built in: Detroit MIDonated to the Museum in 1997 by William Englebrecht.
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AUTO
1954 
International Pickup Truck
International Harvester
MAKE
Pickup Truck
MODEL
Although farm equipment was at the heart of the International Harvester's business, it also included a highly competitive truck line established in 1907. With growing competition in the farm machinery industry, the company launched a national ad campaign in 1954 called, "The International Truck Caravan." The caravan showcased the truck line and toured the country stopping at at local dealerships. International Harvester built light-duty trucks until 1975. The company's truck division was sold to Navistar International Corporation in 1986.Engine Type: 6 cylinderHorsepower: 100Displacement: 220.5 Cubic inchesPrice New: $1,484.00Built in: Canto ILDonated to the Museum in 1988 by William and Irene Blackwell.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1954 
Manufacturer’s Railway #5906 Boxcar
Manufacturer's Railway
TYPE
Boxcar
BUILDER
Boxcar was built in 1954. This 55-foot steel boxcar was rebuilt by Manufacturers Railway in 1979.
IMAGE
RAIL: FREIGHT
1882 
Missouri-Kansas-Texas #1 Caboose
TYPE
Caboose
BUILDER
Missouri-Kansas-Texas #1 Caboose was built in 1882. Wood car; steel center sill added; side door and cupola removed; part of Katy Flyer train.
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AUTO
1929 
A 1929 Elgin-Leach Corp. Street Sweeper
Elgin-Leach
MAKE
Street Sweeper
MODEL
This Elgin Model D street sweeper was the company's first machine designed specifically for automobile traffic.  The brushes concentrated on the curbs instead of the center of the street waste removal typical for horse-drawn traffic.  This 1929 street sweeper is believed to be the oldest street sweeper in America
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AUTO
1925 
1925 Dodge Brothers 2-Door Coach – 5P Police Car Replication
Dodge Brothers
MAKE
2-Door Coach - 5P
MODEL
Although the St. Louis County Police Department was not established until July 1, 1955, this 1925  Dodge Brothers 2-door coach was restored and painted to replicate a police car of the 1920s. This car served as a public relations attraction and was displayed at many community events before it was donated to the Museum in 2004. Engine type: L-head 4 cylinder; displacement: 212.3 cubic inches; horsepower :24.03; wheelbase: 116 inches; donor: Charles and June Gallagher.   
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AUTO
1950 
Dodge Coronet Consolidated Service Car
Dodge
MAKE
Coronet
MODEL
Service cars operated in the same manner as buses and streetcars as they had regular routes with regular stops. Cab drivers and bus companies loathed these cars as they were cheaper to ride  and stole potential customers.By the 1960s, most service car companies had shut and survivors operated limited routes in north St. Louis. The Consolidated Service Car Co. was the last to offer rides and was eventually bought by Bi-State in 1962. However, most drivers owned their cars and continued their service. With the support of the Committee of Racial Equality (CORE), they charged no fare but accepted 'donations' as 'freedom riders.' Bi-State added more routes to compete with the unlicensed service cars but the African American residents boycotted the buses in these areas. The dispute was settled in 1966.This is the last running and remaining service car. Engine type: 6-cyl. L-Head; Displacement: 230 cubic inches; Horsepower: 103; Built in: San Leandro CA; Donors: Herman Perkins, Anthony Sansone, Consolidated Service Car Co.; Acquired by Museum in 1967.
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AUTO
Late 1800s-early 1900s 
Banner Buggy Co. Doctor’s Buggy
Banner Buggy Co.
MAKE
Doctor's Buggy
MODEL
Physicians used buggies of this type to make house calls to their patients often bartering for their services. The Banner Buggy Co. was one of the largest horse-drawn vehicle manufacturers in the country.
OTHER
1957 
Cushman Eagle Scooter
Cushman
Scooter
The Cushman Eagle was an attempt to copy real motorcycle design and it was by far Cushman’s most successful model. The 318CC 8 horsepower motor delivered top speed of nearly 50 MPH. The chrome models are unique because they were made almost exclusively for Shriners to ride in parades and other special events.This scooter was donated in 1987 by the Daniel Hartnett Family.
IMAGE
OTHER
 
Buffalo-Springfield Steam Roller
Buffalo-Springfield
Steam Roller
IMAGE
AUTO
1910 
Buick Motor Bus
Buick
MAKE
Bus
MODEL
Buick built trucks for a very short time. One body style available was the “Old English Motor Bus." It is believed that this is one of the only surviving models of this type. Typically, they were used by hotels as a courtesy vehicle or for sightseeing. The twelve passenger bus has a 2 cylinder 22 horse power engine located under the front seat and it is chain-driven. Donated in 1973 by William S. Abbott, this rare antique was restored to operating condition in 1995 through the generosity of the Buick Automobile Dealers of St. Louis. 
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OTHER
1957 
Gyrodyne XRON-1 Rotorcycle
Gyrodyne Company of America
XRON-1 Rotorcycle
In the mid-1950s, advancements in helicopter technology made a vehicle like this possible. At the end of the Korean War, the U.S. Navy was looking for a small sized helicopter that could be dropped to downed pilots stranded behind enemy lines. Gyrodyne Company of America was awarded the contract and built prototypes to demonstrate their new invention. Three different engines were experimented with over the next few years and this model is equipped with a Porsche 4-cylinder internal combustion engine. Demand by the Navy soon switched to radio-controlled pilotless drones and in 1964 all XRON Rotorcycle work ceased. Allan Barklage donated this Rotorcycle to the museum in 1984.Number built 10 Max Speed 78 mph Cruise Speed 60 mph
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AUTO
1920s 
Portable Gas Caddy
Standard Oil
MAKE
Gas Caddy
MODEL
This portable gasoline caddy from the 1920s allowed vendors to sell and pump gasoline at the curbside. A hand-cranked rotary pump was used to dispense fuel into a customer's vehicle. This gas caddy was donated to the Museum by Standard Oil in 1971.
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OTHER
1948-51 
Dynacycle Bicycle Kit
Dynacyle
Bicycle Kit
St. Louis-based Dynacycle invented manufactured bike kits and motorbikes. A gasoline motor could be attached to any balloon-tired bicycle in place of the crank and peddles and then mounted to the frame. The company claimed to have the smoothest ride of all bike motors on the market due to its Dynamount suspension system, which included rubber rings in the crank housing. The four horsepower engine delivered speeds of up to 45 miles per hour.This bike has a custom-built side cart. It was used by a local grocery store to deliver goods to its customers. Approximately 200 bikes and kits were sold and it is believed only about 30 are still in existence.